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Tag Archives: achievement

Why is Protein so Important After Weight Loss Surgery?

Posted on May 07, 2018 by

can-eat-blueberries-182x300Protein is essential with any weight loss plan.  Protein is essential for muscle and tissue growth and repair.  If you reduce your caloric intake without consuming the necessary amount of protein, your weight loss will be a combination of lean body mass and fat loss.  With adequate protein intake (and exercise), you should be able to preserve your muscle mass, allowing the majority of your weight loss to come from fat stores.  If, over time, you do not meet your daily protein needs, you may experience fatigue, loss of lean body mass, and possible hair loss.

You will need to check with your surgeon, but we recommend that our patients take in at least 90-100 grams of protein every day.  As your weight loss continues, your body will still prefer using your lean muscle as a source of energy.  Therefore, consuming 90-100 grams of protein daily will be a goal throughout your weight loss journey, not just during the beginning phases.

Once your weight has stabilized and you are in a maintenance phase then protein requirements may decrease somewhat into the 60-90 range depending on your weight and overall muscle mass.  The higher your weight the more protein you may require in order to maintain Lean Body Mass.  Men typically require more protein due to their higher total Lean Body Mass.

People seeking medical or surgical weight loss often have many questions surrounding protein intake since it is important for both situations.  How many kinds of protein are there?  Where can I find it?  How much do I need?  What is the best time to have it?  Let’s try to give some straight forward answers to these questions.

The word protein is derived from the Greek word proteios, meaning “of the first quality”.  Protein is essential for life (i.e. we can NOT survive without it!!!) because it contains sulfur and nitrogen, two vital elements for every cell in your body.  Protein also helps produce enzymes and hormones, maintain fluid balance, and regulate numerous vital functions, from building antibodies to building muscle.  The body maintains roughly 50,000 different protein containing compounds, forming the building blocks of muscle, bone, cartilage, skin, hair and blood.

As far at your diet is concerned, there are numerous kinds of proteins, each with their own set of advantages.  The right kinds can make all the difference, especially if you are trying to lose weight and build muscle.  Some of the best protein comes from food. Meat has about 7 grams of protein/oz., large eggs about 7 grams of protein, and milk about 8 grams of protein/8oz.  In a weight loss plan, you have to watch all the extra calories (fat, carbs) that come with food sources of protein.

  • Whey Protein: Whey protein is derived from milk (remember Little Miss Muffet and her curds and whey?).  Many whey protein supplements have had most of the excess fat, cholesterol and lactose removed.  Whey proteins are undoubtedly the most commonly used and most popular protein used in sports nutrition and with good reason.  They are the highest quality protein available with an excellent balance of essential amino acids.  Whey proteins are very efficiently absorbed and this is extremely important but this is also a potential problem.  Because whey protein is so efficiently absorbed (i.e. absorbed quickly) it tends to not keep you feeling full or satisfied for any extended period of time.  For this reason, it also tends to work better if used in small doses (10-20 gms) taken multiple times throughout the day.  Your hunger can potentially return faster than with other proteins.  This brings us to Casein protein.
  • Casein Protein: Casein protein is also derived from milk (the curds part of curds and whey) and is essentially whey’s counterpart.  It also is a very high quality protein with all the essential amino acids.  While whey is absorbed very rapidly, casein forms a slow digesting gel in your stomach.  This in turn promotes a feeling of fullness that can stave off hunger for longer periods of time.  This steady stream of amino acids helps to protect against muscle breakdown.  A good casein based protein supplement made specifically for weight loss is Weight and Inches (29gm protein/serving) which can be obtained from CFWLS.
  • Egg Proteins: Egg proteins digest at a moderate pace.  Eggs are an excellent protein source and mimic the amino acid profile of muscle quite nicely.  Unfortunately, eggs do have a relatively high amount of cholesterol and also arachodonic acid (mainly in the yolks).  Some people are very sensitive to arachodonic acid worsening inflammatory processes.  Egg proteins in supplement form (usually as albumin) have had most of the cholesterol and arachodonic acid removed.
  • Soy Protein: Soy protein is also digested at a moderate pace.  Soy protein contains all of the essential amino acids, but since soy is a plant, it tends to not have quite as good of a ratio of essential amino acids as dairy or egg based protein.  Therefore, it does not tend to protect muscle mass quite as well.  It can still be a good alternative for those who do not tolerate dairy based proteins.

As far as timing goes, ideally you should use smaller doses of protein multiple times throughout the day.  This is especially important after weight loss surgery so even these recommendations will need to be altered somewhat during the phase immediately following surgery.  Starting the day off with a good dose is always a good idea (i.e. that protein shake in the morning).  An example would be 20-30 grams at breakfast, 20-30 grams at lunch and 20-30 grams at dinner.  Then add two 10-20 gram snacks, appropriately spaced between meals.  Positioning a protein snack prior to and immediately after strenuous exercise works extremely well to build/preserve muscle mass.

After surgery, your new stomach pouch will initially only be able to hold about 1-2 tablespoons (15-30cc) of fluid at a time.  This is approximately ½-1 medicine cup.  Your new stomach should eventually stretch to accommodate 6-8 ounces (3/4 to 1 cup) within the first 1-2 years after surgery.  Because your new stomach pouch is so small, you need to follow the guidelines provided by your surgeon to ensure the fluid/food you put in your stomach is the most nutritious possible and does not overfill your small stomach, causing you pain and/or nausea/vomiting.

For delicious recipes that provide adequate protein and are low carb, visit us on Pinterest at: CFWLSVA

What is Life Like After Weight Loss Surgery?

Posted on April 30, 2018 by

necessaryYour feelings regarding life after surgery will likely vary depending upon how far out you are from surgery, your level of preparation prior to surgery, your ability to manage change and your overall attitude/mindset.  Rest assured, there is often not a dry eye in the office as goals are met/exceeded throughout the first year after surgery and beyond.  It’s extremely rewarding for you and everyone involved and you hear more often than not “I wish I would have done this sooner”.  As a generalization, at the Center for Weight Loss Success, we have found that most people go through a few expected phases and the timeframe for each varies:

  • Phase 1: What have I done?
  • Phase 2: I can do this.
  • Phase 3: I am glad I did this.
  • Phase 4: I wish I would have done this sooner!
  • Phase 5: I need to stay on track (especially if necessary long term success habits throughout the first year after surgery weren’t developed)

At the time of this publication, the primary surgery performed by Dr. Clark at the Center for Weight Loss Success is the sleeve gastrectomy.  In fact, most of these patients go home the same day of surgery since you generally recover better in your own home environment.  You go through a thorough pre-operative program and your post-operative program begins right away.

When you first go home from the hospital, here are some general guidelines for what to expect.  Of course, each surgeon has their own particular orders so be sure to follow whatever he/she recommends.

  • With regards to your diet, you will want to make sure you are staying hydrated by sipping all day. You will usually continue with a liquid diet until you are seen by your surgeon 10-14 days after surgery.  You should not have any carbonated beverages – refer to your the liquid diet instructions set forth by your surgeon.  You need to stay hydrated and do your best to try to get about 80-100 grams of protein in per day with high quality protein shakes (again, follow your surgeons specific orders).
  • You will want to be up and walking as tolerated and rest when you are tired. You are usually permitted to shower.  Common sense comes into play here.  If anything is hurting you then you probably should not be doing it yet.  At the Center for Weight Loss Success, we restrict lifting to no more than 20 pounds for the first two weeks and restrict driving for 3-4 days after surgery as long as you are off of your pain medication.  Getting up and moving is a good thing.  Not only for your body but for your emotional state as well.
  • Your surgeon will have specific instructions for wound care and medications. Follow these as instructed.
  • It is not unusual for you to question “What did I do?” the first days after surgery. It is a big adjustment and although you won’t likely feel hungry, just drinking liquids is a big change and can be difficult to get used to.  The first few days tend to be the worst and then you get used to it.  It helps to focus on your goals.  This will all be worth it.
  • Make sure you go to all of your scheduled follow-up appointments and call your surgeon if you have any questions/concerns.

After the first two weeks, you will generally be able to begin “mushy” foods.  At the Center for Weight Loss Success, we have a thorough educational program that guides you through exactly what to do/eat which is beyond the scope of this book.  Your experienced bariatric surgeon/center will likely have similar resources for you.

At approximately one month after surgery, you will begin eating more regular foods.  You will want to focus on getting in an adequate amount of quality protein (at least 90 grams), staying hydrated (sometimes thirst is mistaken for hunger) and easing into a regular exercise regimen.  Your experienced bariatric surgeon/center will have an entire plan set to help guide you through each phase after surgery.  Remember, it is never too early to begin your habits for success.  As a general rule, these include:

  • Eating – Don’t skip meals. Food choices should be low fat and low sugar.  Think “Protein First”.  Eating should be approached as “how little can I eat and be satisfied”, NOT “how much can I fit into my new smaller stomach”.  You will want to cut your food up into small pieces, use a smaller plate, put your fork/spoon down in between bites and chew slowly.  It is best to eat at a table and not “on the run” so you will avoid eating too fast, overfilling your pouch and end up with unnecessary pain or difficulty.
  • Drinking – Try to avoid drinking with your meals since it “washes” the food through quicker and decreases your ability to stay fuller longer. Beverages should be non-caloric and non-carbonated.  Drinking 8 glasses of water each day is a good idea with any weight loss plan.  Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • Vitamins – Multivitamins should be taken daily – Forever. Other vitamins and/or supplements may be needed depending upon individual needs.
  • Sleeping – Make sure you are well rested. You will be most successful if you sleep an average of 7 hours each night.
  • Exercise – Regular exercise is extremely important and should be done at least 3-4 times per week for at least 30-40 minutes.
  • Personal Responsibility – Successful patients take personal responsibility for weight loss/weight control. It’s up to you!!  No one else can lose the weight for you.  The surgery is only a “tool”.  You have to use this tool appropriately.

Every person recovers at a different rate.  It is important to take it one day, one week, and one month at a time.  Be involved in your pre-operative and post-operative educational program and try to attend a support group once a month.  Being around others who are experiencing the same thing or who have a long-term success story to share is very helpful.  When you get to that point, be sure to share your success as well.  Celebrate your accomplishments along the way and reward yourself with something non-food related such as a massage, manicure, pedicure, golf club, fitness center membership, new piece of exercise equipment or a great piece of clothing.  You will not want to invest a large amount of money in clothing because of rapid weight loss.  Joining a clothing exchange with other weight loss surgery patients is helpful too.

Finally, surround yourself with like-minded successful people who support you and your goals.  There are plenty of saboteurs in this world – they may even be your closest family or friends.  This is a topic we could write an entire book about!  In short, ask them for their support and explain the changes you want and need to make (use “I” statements and own your goals).  If they continue to be unsupportive, you may need to limit your time with them.  I know this is easier said than done but it is ok for you to be selfish – this is your time to shine!  Go for it!

What is My Expected Weight Loss After Surgery?

Posted on April 23, 2018 by

Expected weight loss after surgery varies depending upon the surgical procedure, your pre-operative weight and your commitment to following the diet/exercise recommendations after surgery.  On an average, people lose approximately 70% of what they were overweight. For example, if you were 100 pounds over your ideal body weight, you would lose an average of 70 pounds – if you were 200 pounds over your ideal body weight, you would lose an average of 140 pounds.

Prior to selecting your surgeon/bariatric center, ask them what the average weight loss is for their clients after surgery.  At the Center for Weight Loss Success, the average weight loss after weight loss surgery is 127 pounds.  That takes into account weight loss for patients who began with a BMI anywhere between 33 and 50+.

Optimal weight loss results can be attained if you do the following:

  • Attend your scheduled surgeon appointments before and after surgery
  • Attend monthly support group meetings usually provided through your surgeon’s office
  • Strictly follow the diet set forth by your surgeon and if he/she has made nutritional coaching and/or personal training visits available to you through their weight loss surgery program, participate fully and attend these sessions
  • Include your support person(s) in your appointments/classes/support group as appropriate so they fully understand what you need to be doing and how to support you for optimal success
  • Monitor not only your weight but your full body composition (hopefully a service provided at your weight loss surgeon’s office) as you progress post-operatively. You will want to make sure you are losing fat and not your lean body mass (muscle).
  • Be sure to get in enough quality protein (check with your surgeon but usually at least 90 grams per day). This will help with your overall ability to maintain your lean body mass (muscle) which drives your metabolism.  It is also important for healing and prevention of potential long term problems such as hair loss.
  • Incorporate fitness as soon as your surgeon indicates it is safe for you to do so. Walking is a great beginning routine but you will want to incorporate increased cardio training and resistance training with weights.  Your surgeon will likely either provide these services or provide you with an appropriate plan/resource.
  • Immediately after surgery your surgeon will likely be most concerned that you are staying hydrated. Water is very important so be sure to sip all day long and in the long run get approximately 64 ounces of water in every day.  In addition to proper hydration, you need to make sure you are ingesting appropriate amounts of protein as mentioned earlier.
  • Take your vitamins as recommended by your surgeon and make sure they are pharmaceutical grade for optimal quality.
  • Whenever you are trying to lose weight, you can improve your rate of success by journaling what you eat and drink. This also helps as you meet with your surgeon and/or the nutritional coach before and after surgery.
  • Surround yourself with positive people who support your decision to have weight loss surgery. SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE DO

We’re here to help you succeed!  View the Online Weight Loss Surgery webinar now and then schedule your call with my Surgical Coordinator, Cat Williamson: schedule now

Will My Insurance Cover Weight Loss Surgery?

Posted on April 02, 2018 by

Insurance coverage for weight loss surgery varies by state and by the insurance provider.  While some insurers may cover the entire bill, many public or private insurance companies will pay a percentage (usually around 80%) of what is considered “customary and usual” for the surgery as determined by the insurance company.  The first step if you are considering weight loss surgery is to contact your insurance provider (use the provider number on your insurance card) and ask “Is weight loss surgery a covered benefit under my policy?”  Many policies require that the employer providing the policy purchase a “Ryder” for weight loss surgery.  Thus, you might also want to ask “Do I have the Ryder for weight loss surgery on my policy?”  The employer must purchase this Ryder for everyone that is covered under the plan, not just a select few.  There are a number of factors that play into this decision for employers.  However, generally speaking, employers who understand the value of weight loss and the employee benefits (improved/resolved co-morbidities, lower health care and medication costs, less time missed from work and increased productivity to name a few) are more likely to purchase the weight loss surgery Ryder.

"My insurance didn't cover Weight Loss Surgery, but I didn't let that stop me!" Allen Fabijan,  'Some Guy Named Allen' from 106.1

“My insurance didn’t cover Weight Loss Surgery, but I didn’t let that stop me!”
Allen Fabijan, ‘Some Guy Named Allen’ from 106.1

If your initial attempt to authorize coverage is denied, you can appeal, and you should initiate your appeal immediately.   Your experienced bariatric surgeon/center will assist you with this process.  It makes good fiscal sense for your insurer to foot the bill for your weight loss surgery.   According to the Obesity Action Coalition, the upfront costs of weight loss surgery are paid off in three and a half years, due to hospitalization cost savings.  What’s more, the cost of drugs for people with diabetes and high blood pressure plummet following weight loss surgery.  Many are able to stop taking such medications altogether as their blood sugar and blood pressure return to normal levels after weight loss6.

Medicare, the U.S. government health plan as know today for people 65 years of age or older states it will pay for three types of weight loss surgery for patients who are treated in “high-volume” centers that achieve low mortality rates.  The three types of surgeries as we know it today include:

  • The Roux-en-Y bypass
  • Open and laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversions
  • Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

An experienced bariatric surgeon/center can guide you through the Medicare requirements that need to be documented prior to scheduling surgery.  Medicare does not pre-authorize weight loss surgery so you will need to make sure all requirements are met prior to surgery and submitted properly with your claim.  Some private insurers require a letter of medical necessity from a doctor before they will agree to pay for weight loss surgery.  However, Medicare does not require pre-certification and does not pre-authorize weight loss surgery.  As a result, many surgeons may ask Medicare patients to sign a contract stating that they will pay for any costs that Medicare does not cover after processing the claim.  You can find out your specific requirements regarding diet history by contacting your local Medicare provider. However, at the time of this publication, weight loss surgery is an option for Medicare beneficiaries if they have a body mass index (BMI) of 35, with at least one health problem related to obesity such as heart disease or diabetes.  As you are aware, governmental insurance is currently under debate and potential revision.  Thus, you will want to work closely with your experienced bariatric surgeon/center.

6Obesity Action Coalition website. Fact Sheet: Why it makes sense to provide treatment for obesity through bariatric surgery.

Rhonda’s Opinion:  It wasn’t covered by my insurance – that’s ok – just do it and move into the future.  As I said earlier, you should qualify yourself instead of letting a stranger at an insurance company make your health decisions for you.

Dr. Clark and the Center for Weight Loss Success offer the lowest cost options on the East Coast.  Learn more at: Self Pay Surgery

Is Weight Loss Surgery Right for Me?

Posted on March 12, 2018 by

kevin

As you have read, weight loss surgery is a decision that requires research (like you are doing here), a risk/benefit comparison, an evaluation by an experienced bariatric surgeon and soul searching on your part to make sure you are committed to long term changes.  These changes can drastically improve your health, your ability to live your life to the fullest and potentially extend your lifespan.  This may seem overwhelming but the important thing for you to know is that you are not alone.

There is a delay with regards to documented statistics, but here are the clear trends:

  • About 15 million adults in the U.S. have morbid obesity which is associated with more than 30 other diseases and conditions including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, hypertension, asthma, cancer, joint problems and infertility.  The direct and indirect costs to the health care system associated with obesity are about $117 billion annually.5
  • In the United States, the number of people who qualify for weight loss surgery is increasing as the incidence of obesity and morbid obesity is on the rise.
  • In the United States, the number of weight loss procedures performed each year continues to rise with an estimated 177,600 procedures performed in 2006 (an increase from about 16,000 in the early 1990’s).5 In 2008 the number of weight loss procedures was up to 220,000 and remained there in 2009.  Numbers for subsequent years have not been published as of this publication.

5http://asmbs.org/benefits-of-bariatric-surgery/

Telling you that you are not alone and sharing these sobering statistics doesn’t solve the problem for you or the general population.  There has to be a need (and clearly there is a need), there has to be a want (which usually results from the pain endured as a result of being obese or morbidly obese) a viable solution (in this case, surgical weight loss with an experienced bariatric surgeon who is passionate not just about surgery but your long term success).  Sounds like a recipe for success but there is an ingredient that is missing.  You can have a need and a want and a viable solution but if you don’t have the commitment and motivation to follow through and create lasting change for yourself, you may never experience the optimal success you deserve.

If you decide that you have the want, the need and the commitment, you are a great candidate for weight loss surgery.  Now you just need to explore the rest of the questions in this book and get started on your path to success.

View our free Weight Loss Surgery webinar now and then click to schedule your conversation with Cat Williamson, our Surgical Coordinator.

How do I know if I qualify for weight loss surgery?

Posted on March 05, 2018 by

gastric sleeve sleeve gastrectomy GeorgiaIf you are at least 50 pounds over your ideal body weight and have been unsuccessful with other methods of weight loss, you may be a candidate for weight loss surgery.  However, most insurance companies additionally require a BMI of 40 or greater or a BMI of 35-40 with other potentially life threatening health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure and/or sleep apnea.  Your BMI is your weight in relation to your height.  So how do you calculate your BMI?  You need to take your weight in kilograms and divide by the square of your height (meters).  For example, If your weight is 80 kilograms and your height is 1.8 meters, you would square your height (1.82=3.24) and then divide it into your weight (80 divided by 3.24 = a BMI of 24.69).  Or you can simply enter your information online for quick results with a BMI calculator.4

General BMI classification guidelines include:

BMIClassificationHealth Risk
Under 18.5UnderweightMinimal
18.5-24.9Normal WeightMinimal
25-29.9OverweightIncreased
30-34.9ObeseHigh
35-39.9Severely ObeseVery High
40 and OverMorbidly ObeseExtremely High

The decision as to whether or not weight loss surgery is right for you is ideally made by you and your surgeon after careful consideration of your weight, your past medical/surgical history and your current health problems or co-morbidities.  However, there are general guidelines that most surgeons and insurance companies adhere to when choosing who an appropriate candidate for weight loss surgery is as noted below:

General Guidelines for Weight Loss Surgery Candidates3:

  • BMI of 40 or greater
  • Comorbidity: You have a life-shortening disease process, heart disease, diabetes or obstructive sleep apnea that can be improved by losing weight.
  • For at least two years, you have attempted to lose weight.
  • You have been obese for an extended period of time, at least three to five years.
  • You are able to effectively care for yourself and follow a physician’s instructions.
  • You are motivated to lose weight and maintain a healthful lifestyle.
  • You do not abuse drugs or alcohol.
  • You are a nonsmoker or have quit smoking.
  • You are an adult under the age of 65.

These guidelines vary by insurance carrier and your individual policy.  Your insurance policy is an agreement between you and your insurance provider.  However, if you are working with an experienced bariatric surgeon/center, they can easily help you navigate through your particular insurance requirements and efficiently submit your information for surgery authorization. This topic is covered in Chapter 6 of the book, Less Weight…More Life! Is Weight Loss Surgery Right for You?

As with any general guidelines, there are caveats that cannot be ignored. Some of the ones we find most important include age, motivation and mindset.  With regards to age, you can see by the general guidelines listed previously that it is recommended that an adult be under the age of 65.  At the Center for Weight Loss Success (www.cfwls.com) we do not put a cap on age for good reason.  Age is just a number.  You likely know someone who is over 65 years of age yet physically, emotionally and intellectually they are really more like a 40 year old.  Conversely, you likely know someone around 40 who walks, talks and acts as if they should be 80+ years old.  In terms of lower age restrictions, although there are a few centers in the United States performing weight loss procedures on patients under the age of 18, most surgeons prefer to wait until you are 18 years of age or older and able to better decide and commit to such a life changing procedure.

Of great importance is your motivation and mindset.  If you are considering weight loss surgery, you need to be motivated and an active participant throughout your entire pre-operative and post-operative phases.  This is how you will experience the best results.  Weight loss surgery is something you need to do for yourself, not someone else.  You need to prepare yourself physically and mentally prior to surgery and proactively plan for your post-operative phase.  If you believe surgery is a “quick fix” or the “easy way out” you likely should not pursue weight loss surgery.  With this mindset, you may not fully commit to the lifestyle changes that result in the rewarding outcomes that will transform your life in so many positive ways.  However, if you do commit, get ready for an amazing journey.  Try not to get overwhelmed here.  An experienced bariatric surgeon/center will provide a comprehensive process to help guide you through these considerations.

Finally, it is important to note that some people are actually too obese to qualify for weight loss surgery.  If you are too heavy, you will usually be instructed to lose weight before your surgeon can proceed with weight loss surgery.  Once again, an experienced bariatric surgeon/center will guide you through this process and help you optimize your physical and emotional health prior to surgery and beyond.

3 Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity. Consumer Information Sheet. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. March 2008. http:// http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/gastric.htm

4http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/adult_bmi/english_bmi_calculator/bmi_calculator.html

If you don’t qualify for weight loss surgery under your insurance provider, contact my Surgical Coordinator, Cat Williamson at CFWLS to discuss your options.

Walk Your Way Healthy

Posted on October 16, 2017 by

So often people want to exercise, but they don’t know where to start. Walking is a great place to start. Walking is typically easy on the joints, can be done anywhere, and all you need is a comfy pair of shoes.

HOW TO GET 10,000 STEPS A DAYfeet on sidewalk
Everyone knows movement is good for the body. The hardest part is often finding the time, especially if you have an office job. However, 9-5 is a long time to be sitting at a desk. But don’t worry, anything is possible with a little bit of change.

Walking is the best way to start adding movement into your day. Walking is typically easy on the joints, can be added in small time frames, and needs no fancy equipment.

If you have the option, I highly recommend an activity tracker. While pedometers and activity trackers are in no way a necessity, seeing your steps add up can motivate and inspire you to keep moving. Seeing your steps also adds accountability. You may think you are getting an adequate amount of movement, but having a concrete number to track will help you ensure you are hitting your goals.

If you are new to walking try to hit 10,000 steps a day at first. That may seem daunting, but think of reaching 10,000 steps in smaller goals. Set a small goal to hit 250 steps/hour or 100 steps/30 minutes throughout the day. Newer activity trackers can often be set to alert you at different times of the day or a well-placed post-it note can sometimes be all it takes to keep your mind focused on your goal. Also start to recognize what activities equal 100 steps. You’ll be more motivated to continue changing your habits if you can see a concrete benefit that results.

If you are at a desk for the majority of the day there are great ways to sneak in steps throughout your day:

1. First, stepping side-to-side does count! Stand and pace as you read your emails in the morning. Are you brainstorming with colleagues? Don’t be afraid to stand and move as you think. The fun thing about counting steps is every step counts! Even if you’re not walking anywhere.

2. Park in the back of the parking lot. This advice is nothing new. But it still stands as good advice. I bet walking into work in the morning from the last spot in the lot can easily get you 100 steps.

3. Do you take an elevator? Change to taking the stairs. If you are new to stairs don’t feel like you have to conquer them all at once. Simply walk one flight up and then take the elevator the rest of the way. Add in the extra flights as you get stronger. Fitness success is about making a lot of little changes over a long period of time. It’s not about making a lot of changes all at once.

4. Rather than emailing or calling a coworker, walk over to their cubicle.

5. Walk the longest path to the bathroom, printer, scanner, fax, kitchen, water cooler, etc.

6. Take a short walk during your lunch break. Instead of spending your time driving to and from a restaurant, pack your lunch and then squeeze in a short walk with the time you saved.

7. Dress for success! Keep a change of shoes, socks, undershirt, etc. in your car during warmer weather for your longer lunchtime walks. In the winter, keep mittens, hat, and a scarf handy.

8. If it’s still too cold in the winter or too hot in the summer you can head to your nearest mall. Walking end to end one time is sure to add up!

9. Be the one who walks the dog, gets the mail, takes out the trash, and picks up the house before bed

10. Make time with your family count. Take a walk after dinner. Start playing Pokemon Go with your kids. Dance in the kitchen as you cook. Start a new hobby like bird watching, golfing, or hiking. Free time is when you’ll really rack up the steps.

Once you start tracking your steps you’ll be motivated to squeeze in more steps and set new goals. More importantly, you;ll be finding more ways to live a happy and long life. Steps don’t just result in better physical health. Walking will give you more opportunities to de-stress and clear your mind. Innovative ways of hitting your step goals will create new hobbies and create family memories. The more you get moving the more life you’ll have in each step.

Day_34_group

Join the CFWLS Steps for Success and add your daily steps to our group walks!  It’s easy – just log into World Walking and join the group.  It’s fun and a great way to stay inspired.

If you would like more advice on reaching 10,000 steps a day contact a CFWLS personal trainer or lifestyle coach today.

Spring Teller croppedContributed by Spring Teller, CPT, Group Instructor

Two Things to Remember About Eating and Weight Loss

Posted on October 09, 2017 by

2017-03-29_17.13.23_smaller squareI’m going to talk about my two favorite eating rules. Eating rules can help you keep on your dietary plan. They don’t make it easier to do, but they’re fairly simple.

The first one is always sit down at a specific location to eat. It doesn’t matter if it’s a snack or a meal.  Always sit down and always have it be a specific location. Eat at a specific location in your home. It gets rid of that eating on the run or eating over the kitchen sink. There are some specific decisions that have to be made.  You’re physically going to get the food, sit down, and eat it in a specific location. That’s the first eating rule.

Number two is always use utensils. This requires more decisions.  Even if it is finger food (which typically isn’t what I call eating clean), you still have to use utensils.  If it’s an Oreo or chips, you have to sit down at a certain place, and you have to use utensils. If you can do this, they’re very simple rules. Simple doesn’t necessarily mean easy. If you can do this, you’ll find it easier to stick to your dietary plan. Multiple decisions have to be made in order to get there. So when you are potentially “straying”, you’ve got multiple decisions points that you can actually change your mind.

Number one, sit in a specific location. 

Number two, always use utensils. 

The Best Weigh In Routine – Part 2

Posted on October 02, 2017 by

Dr C with tie croppedI want to complete the video I made last week which was about routine weighing. Should you weigh yourself routinely or not?  My inclination is, yes, people ought to weigh themselves regularly. I think people should weigh themselves daily.

I want to talk about what the real reason is for weighing yourself daily. Especially if you’re in a weight loss program, whether you’ve had surgery or you’re in the middle of a weight loss plan, I encourage people to weigh themselves daily. During the weight loss program, you’re not just weighing yourself to watch the pounds come off. The real reason to weigh daily is to get in the habit of weighing yourself routinely for maintenance.

Maintenance is hard.  It’s actually harder than weight loss. So, you want to get in the habit of weighing yourself routinely during the weight loss plan so that you’re doing it for maintenance. If you weight yourself daily during maintenance you’ll notice little fluctuations.  If you notice little fluctuations you can look back on that 24 hours and figure out, “What did I do differently during those 24 hours that would affect today’s weight?”  Typically there is going to be something. You’ll be able to figure that out a lot easier if you’re weighing yourself routinely (daily).  If you try to look back a week’s period of time you really have no idea what you did differently. So, this is the reason you want to weigh yourself routinely so you can have those little fluctuations under control.

Maintenance, as I mentioned, is harder than weight loss. It’s easier to make little modifications by looking back over the past 24 hours to figure out what you did differently and then modify what you’re doing.  You can change that fairly easily. So that’s why you should weigh yourself daily.  It’s so that you can be in the habit of doing it for maintenance.

Stop in anytime to check your BCA – and don’t forget to add those pounds to the total on our home page!

 

The Best Weigh In Routine

Posted on September 25, 2017 by

Dr C with tie croppedShould you weigh yourself routinely or not? You’ll see things all over the map like “You should never weigh yourself” or “You should just go with how you feel” or “If you feel good, you’re good.”  There are a lot of questions out there and I’m going to give you my thought on that whole issue about weighing.  Weighing is the best monitor we have as far as keeping track of your weight and overall health.

Weighing is a good way to look at health because when our weight is stable, we tend to be in stable health. When our weight is changing very quickly one way or the other, potentially there can be changes in health. In a weight loss program we’re obviously trying to lose weight.  So, subsequently then we want to keep track of these things.

Should your weigh in routine be once a week, twice a week, should we step on the scale whenever?? I encourage people to weigh themselves daily and you should weigh yourselves early in the morning.  If you forget to weigh yourself early in the morning, don’t bother.  Wait until the next day. It should be routine weighing.  Why do I say that? Many of the patients I see are very sensitive to carbohydrates.  As we’ve talked about many times in the past, carbohydrates influence insulin level. Insulin is one of the hormones that makes you retain water. It also makes you store fat. If insulin levels go up, you store fat, but the first thing you do is retain water. Subsequently, weight jumps up. So, it’s actually a good monitor to weigh yourself.  Many of our patients are sensitive to carbohydrates and even a little carbohydrate causes a significant weight increase.

If your weigh in routine is daily, it’s relatively easy to look back on the past 24 hours and see what you did differently. Where did you stray?  What happened over the last 24 hours? If your weigh in routine is once a week, it’s hard to look back at a whole week period of time and see what happened differently.  It seems like we’re doing the same things week-to-week. But day-to-day it’s much easier to monitor your weight and notice little changes. And, little changes will matter. If you’re sensitive to carbohydrates, one bad day can cause your weight to jump up significantly. If you wait a week to find that out, you’ll never really know what happened. This goes along with the journaling discussion we’ve had as well. So, write things down and weigh yourself routinely.

I typically like people to weigh themselves in the morning.  Early in the morning is your most accurate weight. As we progress throughout the day, we typically will retain some fluid and weight will go up.  Make it a part of the morning routine.  Get up, weigh yourself, and get on with your day. If you’re someone who is going to obsess about the numbers, understand that the weight does fluctuate day-to-day even when you’re doing all the right things.  Don’t obsess about that number.  What I encourage people to do is to look at what’s happened on average over the past 7 days. But don’t obsess about the numbers because there are lots of reasons to have fluid shifts and fluctuations up and down, and it may not be something you ate the previous day.  It could be that you’re close to your cycle (women).  It could be blood pressure or salt issues. There are lots of little things that will play into that. The biggest thing tends to be the carbohydrate sensitivity. Overall, I recommend you weigh yourself daily early in the morning.  If you forget, wait until the next morning.

Don’t forget to post your weight losses on the Home Page of the website!