Center for Weight Loss Success

Call Now!

757-873-1880

success@cfwls.com

Watch a Weight Loss Surgery Webinar Now

FREE WEIGHT LOSS GUIDE!

Food Pyramid & Habit Guide for Weight Loss Success
Keys to Successful Weight Loss and Long-Term Weight Control

captcha
.

Tag Archives: blood sugar

Ditch the Sweet Stuff

Posted on July 18, 2016 by

Ditch the Sweet StuffWhat’s Hiding in Your Pantry? Go ahead – open the door.  It’s in there and you won’t have to look too far. Take the first package you see and turn it around. Find the nutrition label and look about two-thirds of the way down the list.  What do you see?  Total Carbohydrates – eeeek!  Sugar is hiding in places that you would least expect and may be the prime culprit in your battle of the bulge.

Carbohydrates tend to be mostly empty calories and leave us wanting for more almost as soon as we’ve finished whatever was in the package.  These sugars cause an excess blood sugar surge and trigger an insulin release in your body. Insulin, also being a fat-storage hormone, promptly sends these calories packing – right where you don’t want them – around the mid-section (aka Belly Fat!)

Cutting back on carbohydrates may help you do more than just lose weight.  Studies show that there are dozens of additional health benefits when eliminating extra sugar from your diet.  Here are 10 of our favorites!

1. It lowers your chance of diabetes

Just 2 sodas a day increase your chance of becoming one of the millions with Type 2 diabetes by 26%.  Steady sugar intake can result in insulin resistance. Easy decision – drink water!

2. It reduces your risk of certain cancers

Research suggests that risk of certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, can be attributed to excess sugar intake. Why take chances?

3. It may lower your blood pressure

Excess weight has long been considered the major factor in hypertension. New studies indicate that sugary foods can also increase blood pressure. When the heart and arteries are taxed over long periods of time, damage can occur in the whole circulatory system.  This can lead to heart disease, heart attacks, stroke, kidney damage, artery disease and other coronary conditions.

4. It promotes healthy skin

Added sugar can leave the skin looking dull and wrinkled. Sugar in your bloodstream attaches to proteins, a process called glycation, that results in damage to your collagen and elastin. It may also leave your skin more prone to sun damage.

5. It improves brain function

Sugar can eat away at your brain cells much like it does your tooth enamel! Research shows a correlation between impaired cognitive function and excessive sugar intake. It has also shown to reduce the proteins that are necessary for memory and responsiveness.

6. It decreases your bad cholesterol

Consuming too many carbohydrates may lead to lower levels of HDL (good cholesterol) and higher levels of LDL (bad cholesterol) as well as higher triglycerides (blood fats).  Clogged arteries can lead to heart disease!

7. It may help you avoid fatty liver disease

Fatty liver disease is very common in this country and is directly related to the excess sugar in the American diet.  High blood sugar results in excess insulin in the system that drives fat into the liver cells. This disease can increase your risk of diabetes, heart attacks and even cancer.

8. It makes for easy breathing

Those that partake in a high carbohydrate diet may be more likely to suffer from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).  COPD is the third leading cause of death in the country!

9. You’ll have more energy

Carbohydrates give you energy – right?  Wrong!  Excess sugar actually decreases the activity in our orexin cells. These cells help keep us awake and lift our metabolism – that could explain the need for a nap after a carb-filled lunch.

10. You’ll have more $$ to spend on the fun things in life!

We recently talked with a surgical patient who had added up the cost of all the sodas and junk food he had been buying compared to what he was now spending on good food.  Even we were amazed!  You can save hundreds of dollars each month – and spend it on something to celebrate your healthy life!

Weight Loss Surgery Success – Carbohydrate Sensitivity and Insulin Resistance

Posted on November 26, 2014 by

Looking for a Little More Energy?

Posted on November 10, 2014 by

everythingI love Fall!  The crispness of the air and leaves crunching under my feet makes me feel invigorated!  Even so, we are headed into a very busy time of year and many of you may feel like you don’t have enough energy to tackle what lies ahead for the day.  Let’s take a look at possible causes.

There are a number of reasons why you might be lacking energy such as lack of quality sleep (especially if you suffer from sleep apnea), lack of fitness (it seems as if exercise may cause fatigue but actually, the opposite is true), or eating the wrong types of foods or the wrong “ratio” of macronutrients.  This final reason is what I am going to focus on here.

Primary macronutrients are the only energy sources that help maintain and repair your body.  There are three primary ones briefly summarized below:

Carbohydrates are the body’s most efficient source of fuel.  Whether simple or complex, they are all broken down into sugars – called glucose.  When your muscles and organs have used all the       glucose it needs, your body then stores this sugar as body fat.

Proteins break down into amino acids which are used to build and repair your body’s tissue.  Animal proteins (meats, fish, poultry, dairy and eggs) are complete proteins while plant proteins (beans, rice, vegetables, nuts) are considered incomplete.  The exception to this is soy protein.  You cannot live without protein!

Fats also provide energy but not as readily as carbohydrates.  Food fats are essential for the proper functioning of your body.  They provide essential fatty acids that your body cannot make.  They are found in meats, fish, poultry and dairy products.

So in a very simple explanation, you may get quicker energy from carbohydrates but once broken down into sugar (rather quickly), your blood sugar increases and your pancreas begins to produce the hormone insulin.  Insulin then causes your blood sugar to go down (often causing transient        hypoglycemia depending upon the amount and type of carbohydrate ingested) and can result in      feelings of fatigue, hunger, nausea and other negative symptoms.  You may then eat to combat these symptoms and begin this cycle all over again.  By the way, another side effect of insulin is fat storage.

I mentioned you might lack energy because of the wrong “ratio” of nutrients.  As the simplest           explanation (even works for my kids), you should try to eat foods that have at least double the amount of protein than the amount of carbohydrate (2:1 ratio of protein:carbohydrate) to            combat these swings in your blood sugar and excessive insulin production.  Keep your blood sugar stable and those negative symptoms usually improve (and you have more energy as a result).  Of course, there is more to it than that but that’s why I created My Weight Loss Academy™ and Weight Management University™!

 

The Hormone You Need to Understand for Weight Loss – Insulin

Posted on April 07, 2014 by

CFWLS-20110922-018webInsulin is a hormone made by the pancreas and helps keep your blood sugars in a normal range.  The higher your blood sugars go, the more insulin is released to help bring your sugar level back down.   The fasting insulin tells you how much insulin it takes to keep your blood sugar at the fasting level.  That is insulin’s main job.  It tries to keep blood sugars in a normal range.  It does this by facilitating the transfer of sugar molecules out of your blood stream and into your cells.  Subsequently, the blood sugar comes down.  But this also means that the sugar content in the cells goes up.  Your cells then need to “do something” with those sugar molecules.  The cells generally only have two choices of what to do with the sugar:  use it immediately for energy or store it for later.  Most of your cells cannot store sugar as sugar.  They must convert it to fat (which it can do very efficiently).  So if the cell does not need the sugar molecules for energy immediately, it stores them – as fat.  So…insulin is a fat storage hormone.  Insulin also does some other things which are potentially detrimental to our health:  increases cholesterol and triglycerides, increases blood pressure, and increases water retention.

The “drive through version” (reviewed in much more detail during your Weight Management University™ program) is that anything you can do that will bring insulin levels down will help your overall health.  When insulin levels come down and stay low, you mobilize fat…not store it.  And…isn’t that the point of a weight loss plan?  So the real question you have then is – How do you stay in “fat burning mode” NOT “fat storing mode”?

Fortunately, insulin is one of the few hormones which you have some control over.  Insulin only goes up when blood sugars go up – in order to bring blood sugars back down.  So the way to bring insulin levels down is to keep your blood sugars as low in the normal range as possible.  The lower you keep your blood sugars, the lower your insulin levels stay.

So what keeps blood sugars low?  The simple version – avoiding carbohydrates (especially simple, refined carbohydrates) is what keeps blood sugars low.  All carbohydrates are eventually converted to sugar molecules.  So any carbohydrate can potentially increase your blood sugar.  The bottom line to all of this is that it takes a low carbohydrate diet to bring insulin levels down.  If you aren’t sure how to make that work with your lifestyle, let us know – it’s one of our specialties.