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Weight Loss Surgery Options

Posted on October 15, 2019 by

Let’s talk about the problem of obesity and what you can do about it. I will preview the operative procedures and the risks of having surgery, as well as the results. I’ll give you my opinion. For most people I think the sleeve gastrectomy is the better option! I see all the nutritional problems that arise and abnormal anatomy problems with the bypass. And I see the device problems with the adjustable bands. There’s relatively poor weight loss with the bands. The sleeve gastrectomy is a fairly low risk procedure.  It’s a quick recovery and we see really good weight loss with it. And, you keep your anatomy normal. I’ve become convinced over the years that keeping the anatomy normal is probably a good thing.

Weight loss is hard. Surgery is an extension of an overall medical weight loss plan. Weight doesn’t magically fall off just because you have surgery. It’s still diet, exercise, and behavior modification. Surgery is a “tool” to assist you with weight loss. That’s all it is. A tool can either be used correctly, or it can be used incorrectly. If used correctly it can be very powerful. If used incorrectly it doesn’t work well and you can get into some real problems. Long term weight control is still very hard. Some people think they’ve had the surgery and lost the weight so they don’t have to worry about it anymore. YES YOU DO! You can regain your weight. It doesn’t matter what operation we’re talking about. You need to do the right thing. You have to know what the right things to do are. Then, how do you implement those things? Sometimes the concepts are really straight forward but you have to know what they are. Implementing the concepts is the hard thing. We have the expertise and support here. We can help you with how you do this in your life. Sometimes life tends to get in the way. Surgery combined with a Medical Weight Loss program gives you the best chance for long term success. It’s not that we’re doing better or different operations but we see better weight loss than other places. We see better weight loss because it’s the education and support side of this whole thing that really gets people optimizing weight loss and then keeping that weight off long term. That’s absolutely key.

Lots of different medical problems go along with weight. Every single one I’ve listed on the slide is directly related to weight. When weight goes up, they get worse. As weight comes down, they get better. Some of them completely go away with weight loss. If they don’t go away, at least they get under control. Some of them are very significant: diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and more. These things can potentially be life threatening. Weight loss treats them all. If I could boil it down to the biggest problem it’s the risk of dying. It goes way up. For someone who is 75-100 pounds overweight, on average, you’re going to die about 10-15 years before someone who’s not overweight. That’s the issue. We want you to live a long, healthy life and die of old age. Last thing you want is that premature death. By treating the weight, we can treat all those other problems.

To learn more about your weight loss surgery options, check out our informative webinar: Weight Loss Surgery Webinar

Get your free digital copy of my best-selling book too!  (Details here)

The Top 10 Dieting Mistakes

Posted on October 07, 2019 by

We all make mistakes, especially when we’re trying new things like weight loss. With weight loss people have typically tried many things. These are going to be some of the more common mistakes. You need to see it as an opportunity to change, and hopefully for the better.

Mistake #1 is “kinda” working on weight loss. Kinda working on weight loss does not work! We often want that quick fix. We have to learn the skills over a period of time. If you’re just going to “kinda” work on it, it isn’t going to work. Skills have to be learned. Then, they have to be ingrained and become habit.  They have to be practiced over and over and over again so they can become lifelong habits. Think about a serious athlete trying to make the Olympics. They can’t just “kinda” work on it.  Commitment is absolutely essential. You can’t expect perfection. We’re going to make mistakes.

Mistake #2 is making weight loss too complicated. Yes, weight loss is hard, but you really need to stick to the basics.  The basics are: dietary changes, behavior/habit modification, and increased activity and fitness. Those are the basic concepts. It sounds easy, but obviously it’s not so easy. I put together a webinar about a month ago that went over some really important concepts about controlling weight. It really boiled down to controlling insulin levels. It was about all the things you need to do to control insulin levels. Diet has to be the cornerstone of all that. Slowly work on all the basics and you will continue to make progress. With any type of change you need to ask yourself two questions: Can I do it? Is it worth it? If you can’t answer yes to those two questions you’re going to struggle and not make that long term change.

Mistake #3 is not exercising!  Exercise does not make you lose weight faster. So many people come in and say they’d be losing weight faster if they were exercising. It’s probably not true, but it’s still very important. It’s absolutely essential to preserve lean body mass. The natural part of aging is losing lean body mass at a rate of 1% a year.  LBM is what drives your overall metabolism. Simplistically speaking, a pound of muscle burns a lot more calories than a pound of fat. It’s actually a pound of well-trained muscle (think of the Olympic athlete) burns calories like crazy versus a pound of fat. You want to have a fuel-burning machine.  Muscle does that. Our overall metabolism is dependent on how much lean body mass we have. The better trained the lean body mass, the higher the metabolism will be. You can increase your metabolism with better trained muscle. It burns a lot more calories than untrained muscle. So exercise is extremely important. It doesn’t make you lose weight faster. It makes you lose weight longer and makes it so much easier to keep that weight off.

Mistake #4 is avoiding the scale. I’ve said many times that the scale is the best monitor we have. Patients often say they don’t weight themselves routinely.  They only weigh when they come into the office. Why would you think that’s a good idea??! I’ve said many times that you need to stand on the scale every day. The best time to weigh yourself is early in the morning. It’s the most accurate. If you forget to weigh yourself in the morning, just wait until the next day. Your weight will go up during the day. Make that part of your morning routine. The reason is to reflect on the previous 24 hours. What was different about that previous 24 hours? You’ll figure out the little things that matter. It may be as simple as you had to much salt or you didn’t have a bowel movement. Those little things that we typically eat really matter and will show up on the scale.  Once a week doesn’t work.  How many of us can look back on a week and figure out what we did differently during that week versus the previous week? Literally two days I can’t remember what I did differently. Looking back on 24 hours is relatively simple. What worked? What didn’t work? You’ll figure those little things out that affect day to day weight.

Mistake #5 is believing that genetics is responsible for your weight. Genetics does influence our weight. But if we are using genetics as a reason for our weight that’s just an excuse. When you really look closely at that thought process, weight is more likely contagious than it is inherited.  We tend to do the things we surround ourselves with. If everyone in your family is overweight it is slightly genetics but it’s very likely what they’re eating and doing. It tends to be contagious. We do the things that the people we hang around do. That’s true in our family and social life. It’s going to be a very rare situation where genetics is truly the reason. Weight is more likely contagious rather than inherited.

Mistake #6 is giving in to saboteurs. Friends, family, and acquaintances will all try and sabotage you. They will say the following:  “You deserve this.” “A little won’t hurt.”  “It’s the holidays!” There will be saboteurs. Be prepared to say, “No thank you” in multiple different ways. Deflect the comments by changing the subject. Explain to them the importance of this and that you want to recruit them to help. Tell them you value their support. You want them to help you rather than hinder you. Sometimes they don’t realize they’re sabotaging your progress.

Mistake #7 is being inconsistent. It’s that mentality of, “I’ve been good all week. I’m going to take the weekend off.” “I deserve this vacation because I’ve been so good.” Consistency goes along with commitment. Ask yourself those questions: “Can I do it?” “Is it worth it?” A bad weekend can undo 2 weeks of hard work. You tell yourself that you can slide just a little bit. You’ll find that you’ll slide a lot. It’s really easy to gain weight. It’s incredibly easy to gain weight. Write down your motivations for weight loss and review them often. “Why am I doing this?” “Where do I want to go with this?” Hopefully you’ll realize being consistent is worth it.

Mistake #8 is not eating enough. The common thinking is less is better. The reality is starvation has never been a good weight loss plan. Starvation is cutting way back but history has shown that it isn’t successful for weight loss. Fifty to sixty years ago some semi-starvation experiments were done. Around WW II there were contentious objectors. These people refused to join the military so they were asked to help by being put on semi-starvation diets. They found that if you cut those calories in half of what someone normally would be eating, people didn’t actually lose weight. They lost weight for a while but their metabolism slowed way down to make up for the calorie deficit. Part of the problem with just decreasing calories, and to continue to decrease calories, is that it only tends to work for a short period of time. Your body adjusts fairly quickly and it will slow your metabolism way down. It can slow it down to almost 50%. That is your body’s survival mechanism which is good if there truly is a famine. However, most of us aren’t living in a famine. Part of the issue with the semi-starvation diets is they cut their protein way back. If you’re getting sufficient protein, typically your calories will be decent.  Weight loss will become more difficult. It will also become really easy to regain weight.

I had written that mistake #9 was skipping meals. It’s actually not such a bad thing because intermittent fasting works really well. Intermittent fasting is just skipping meals. I do encourage people to eat breakfast for a couple of reasons. There are also reasons to skip breakfast. There isn’t a right and a wrong here. I’ve become convinced about that. Some of it depends on what you’re eating for breakfast. If you tend to eat a high carbohydrate breakfast, studies show you’re going to be eating 300-400 calories a day extra because you tend to be hungrier. If you’re going to eat a high protein breakfast you tend to stay full longer and you eat about 200 calories less a day. Most people don’t wake up starving. For certain individuals, skipping meals can actually work nicely. Skipping meals can actually be a good thing.

The NEW Mistake #9 is thinking that meal “timing” doesn’t matter. It DOES matter. The same meal late in the evening has a greater insulin response.  If you eat that meal earlier it will have a different insulin response. This goes along with skipping meals. Some people do much better with eating 2 meals a day. We already talked about intermittent fasting. It works. There’s no doubt about it. Insulin is key to weight control. The longer time you can spend with lower insulin levels, the easier it is to lose weight. The concept of eating multiple small times throughout the day will never work well. If you’re sensitive to carbohydrates or somewhat insulin resistant, the small meals throughout the day will never work for you. The reason is that, no matter what, whatever we eat will raise insulin levels. Carbohydrate just does it the most. You want to spend as much time as possible with low insulin levels. Skipping meals will give you more time with lower insulin levels.  Eating the same amount of calories but spreading it out throughout the day is asking your body to stimulate insulin levels multiple times throughout the day. That concept doesn’t have a whole lot to do with how many calories you’re eating. It’s just a pattern of eating. Timing matters. It’s a really rare person that controls their weight well by eating a little bit multiple times throughout the day. That’s just not my patient population. That’s not who I see. There are some individuals who aren’t that sensitive to carbohydrates. Those people will be fine eating small meals throughout the day.

Mistake #10 is having that “All or None” mentality. It’s feeling that you’re either doing everything great, but if you make a mistake you’re all done and throwing in the towel. This is a learning process. We’re human and we won’t be perfect every day. Accept the mistakes and move on. You didn’t gain the weight overnight. It didn’t happen with just one meal or one bad day. When you have that bad day, chalk it up to a learning experience. Figure out what you’re going to do differently when you’re in that same situation next time. Figure out those tools you can utilize to prevent you from falling off the deep end and get back on track for the next meal. Don’t beat yourself up.

In summary, to err is human but it does not define your destiny. Don’t let mistakes derail your weight loss plan. Dust yourself off and keep going. At CFWLS this is what we do. We’re here to help you. If you need some help just give us a yell. If you have any questions give us a yell here at CFWLS. Call, send an email, or walk in the door.  You should be checking your body comp. Make sure you’re losing fat not lean body mass.

If you would like weekly weight loss tips and recipes and a chance to ask me questions, subscribe to Losing Weight USA!  Remember it’s your life! Make it a healthy one! Have a good evening everyone.  Take care!

Gluten Sensitivity – Part 2

Posted on September 30, 2019 by

Wheat flour-why are you everywhere?!!  There are a couple of good books that I mentioned in the article. One is “Wheat Belly” by Dr. William Davis. Also a good book is “Grain Brain” by Dr. David Perlmutter.

A quote from Dr. William Davis:  “The world’s most popular grain is also the world’s most destructive ingredient.” A quote from Dr. David Perlmutter:  “gluten is our generation’s tobacco-addicting and potentially causing long term problems.” I think there’s some real truth to both of those statements.

Wheat has fed the world. It’s been around for a while. The proliferation of wheat products parallels the expansion of our waists. What truly raises blood sugar the most?? White sugar? Snickers bar? Banana? Whole wheat bread?  The answer is whole wheat bread. It raises blood sugar more than anything else out there. Wheat is the dominant source of gluten. It’s found in everything (cosmetics, shampoo, and more).  Wheat constitutes about 20% of all calories consumed worldwide.  How many aisles in the grocery store are actually dedicated to wheat/grain products at the grocery store? There’s the bread aisle, baking aisle, snack aisle, cereal aisle, pastry aisle.. Wheat is almost everything. You have to “let go” of a few myths:  Low fat, high carb diet is good. And, cholesterol is bad.

Wheat was first cultivated @330 BC and was Einkorn wheat. Wheat has dramatically changed over the past 50 years. It’s been over 2000 plus years now. Hybridized and crossbred to make it resistant to disease and drought is one reason it has changed. It means we can grow a lot more wheat. But it also means an increase in yield (10X from 50 years ago). It’s a good thing we can feed people. The problem is that modern wheat has been so modified that today’s strain could not survive in the wild without the fertilization/pest control. Unfortunately with all this modification it really hasn’t been tested that much to see if it’s actually safe. It’s just assumed that the new strains are going to be safe.  But there are a lot of assumptions out there that don’t prove to be correct.  So we don’t know if it’s true or not. We just assume these hybrids of wheat really are safe. Wheat gluten has undergone significant structural change with the hybridization. It’s a different thing now than when it was 2000 years ago.

I s wheat addictive? Obviously a lot of drugs are addictive. Exogenous drugs can supercharge or hijack the CNS. Examples of these drugs are: cocaine, tobacco, and heroin.  The endogenous opiod-like products are endorphins.  Endorphins give us some of those “highs” (exercise highs).  There are other exogenous opiod-like peptides that are found in wheat (gluten exorphins and gliadorphins-prominent part of the wheat). So there is some kind of “feel good” property when we first eat these things. It’s more than just a blood sugar rush. There are other things that are actually occurring.  Can they actually make you crave “another hit?” Certain people may be more susceptible just as people who are more susceptible to alcohol or heroine.

Wheat/carbs lead to increase blood sugar swings which then increases insulin levels. Insulin is the hormone that turns on fat storage, especially in the abdominal area. Wheat also increases inflammatory markers. When inflammatory markers go up we also tend to gain weight in the abdominal area. Also, it reduces the production of Adiponectin (heart protective and aids in weight loss). If we reduce adiponectin, we’re going to have a harder time losing weight.

People with celiac disease have to avoid all aspects of gluten. It is a major problem.  Antibodies to wheat gliadin are found in the blood. It causes inflammation of the intestinal tract. Gluten also affects Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gastroesophageal reflux disease.  Reflux is probably one of the biggest problems that I see that wheat can cause.  Get rid of the grains. Gluten can cause bloating, cramping, gas, constipation ,diarrhea and more.

Wheat can increase blood sugar easier than most everything else. Diabetes was unseen in the hunter/gatherer societies until the introduction of cultivating wheat/grain. Wheat consumption parallels diabetes and obesity. The average weight consumption is about 133 pounds a year.

Does wheat make you age faster?? Wheat, carbs, and fructose all increase Advanced Glycation End-products (AGE). It causes stiff arteries, increases cataracts and slows neuronal connections (dementia).  So….wheat free is (potentially) anti-aging!

LDL is often referred to as “bad cholesterol.”  Actually only parts of LDL are bad. Diet influences this. Carbs/wheat will increase VLDL and triglyceride formation, and subsequently increase small LDL’s. Gluten can potentially make heart disease worse. Insulin turns on lipogenesis in the liver, therefore increasing production of small LDL and triglycerides.

AGE (advanced glycation end-products) causes the loss of skin elasticity (wrinkles). Wheat can cause acne. Foods that increase blood sugar and insulin will also increase acne.  Wheat definitely causes dermatitis herpetiformis (uncomfortable and unsightly patches on the skin). Wheat can also cause mouth ulcers, acanthosis nigricans (darkening of the skin), psoriasis, pyoderma gangrenosum (hair problems) and hair loss.

Thomas Edison said, “The chief function of the body is to carry the brain around.” There’s a lot of truth to that statement. Dr. David Perlmutter said, “The origin of brain diseases is in many cases predominately dietary. Although several factors play into the genesis and progression of brain disorders, to a large extent numerous neurological afflictions often reflect the mistake of consuming too many carbs and too few healthy fats.” Our ancestors didn’t have sugar and wheat as available to them. Their diet consisted of 5% carbs, 20% protein, and 75% fat. The USDA diet is 60% carbs, 20% protein, and 20% fat. That’s a lot different. The problems with our health have evolved very quickly over the last 40 years with this recommended diet. Maybe we need to re-think this. Almost all degenerative conditions are associated with inflammation and the biggest instigators of inflammation are  carbohydrate and often gluten (both increase production of cytokines).   The assault on the brain is much harder to recognize until it’s too late. It’s also harder to measure. The real question is, “What if we are all sensitive to gluten from the perspective of the brain:” (Dr. David Perlmutter). If we got rid of gluten would we have a lot less brain disorders?

I already talked about the exorphins which are temporary. But inflammation affects everything including the brain. The following can be affected by wheat: worsening ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, worsening migraines, brain fog, and mood swings.

The bottom line is wheat is everywhere and it’s probably not helping you. What do you do? Going gluten free doesn’t mean eating gluten free! Many things that are labeled gluten free are just substituting one starch for another. Eating gluten free is not a bad idea but it doesn’t mean you need to eat the foods that are labeled as gluten free. Remember the “core” of your eating plan: hydration (water is best),  good protein sources, and colorful vegetable and salad. The best foods have no labels on them. There is no such thing as carbohydrate or wheat deficiency!

You can get those books just about anywhere. Wheat Belly is by Dr. William Davis and Grain Brain is by Dr. David Perlmutter.

Gluten Sensitivity – Part 1

Posted on September 23, 2019 by

I want to start out with some humor. It’s a cartoon. The doctor is talking to the patient and says, “The high carb diet I put you on 20 years ago gave you diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. Oops.” How true is that?!

I have a graph that shows what’s happened over the last 20 years or so. It’s the year versus the number of diabetics. The number of diabetics was fairly stable in the early 80’s into the 90’s.  As the population grew, it went up a little bit. It was stable at about 6-7 million. Then in 1992 the US Government endorsed a high-carb, low fat diet. The American Diabetic Association and the American Heart Association followed suit with similar recommendations in 1994.  Then in 1994 the graph started going up. From the early 90’s at 6 million diabetics to the 2000’s and now it’s over 20 million. That’s a huge increase in a short period of time. Coincidence??? I don’t think so.

Gluten has been around for a long period of time. It’s a Latin word that means glue. It’s a large water soluble protein found mainly in grains. Wheat is the biggest culprit. It gives elasticity to dough. It helps it rise and keep its shape. There are a lot of disorders that can be related to gluten. We call them gluten related disorders. It’s an umbrella term of any disease that is triggered by gluten.  This includes Celiac Disease (the one that you hear about most), gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. You sometimes hear the term gluten intolerance.  The real term is gluten sensitivity. Intolerance means you don’t tolerate it well. All of these are immune related disorders. Your immune system is responding to the exposure of gluten. For some people it can be a life threatening problem.  If they get even close to gluten they have all kinds of problems.

Celiac disease affects about 1-2% of the population. The prevalence of this is going up and up.  We’ll talk about why later. There’s something different now about the wheat than there was years ago. Unfortunately it’s never been tested to see if it’s a safe thing. Some of the symptoms are chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. It’s a true anti-inflammatory response in the intestinal tract.  The diagnosis is made by endoscopes. A biopsy is taken. The treatment is a gluten free diet.  There’s no other treatment.

Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity means you don’t have the full blown disease. These people feel there are certain problems that arise when they eat gluten. You may or may not have any intestinal complaints. Multiple symptoms are improved when gluten is removed.  This is much more common (30-40% of the population).The percentage of the population continues to go up.

A true Wheat Allergy is like an anaphylaxis. It’s like someone allergic to peanuts eats one by mistake, they go into anaphylaxis. This is a very quick onset. The others have a slow onset. A wheat allergy is much rarer.

Gluten is made up of glutenin and gliadin. There’s also water which gives the dough its elasticity. It tends to be everywhere! That’s where the problems come in. Many grains and products have gluten in them. Where is it hidden? The obvious one is wheat. Anything that has wheat in it is going to have gluten. It’s also found in barley, bulgur, cous cous, matzo, rye, spelt, and more. There are grains that don’t have any gluten in them. Some of those grains are relatively rare. Some of them are common like potato, corn, rice and millet.  I’ve made a list of things you wouldn’t guess have gluten in them: baked beans, beer, blue cheese, bouillon, most cereals, chocolate milk, energy bars, egg substitutes, hot dogs, fruit fillings, ice cream, imitation crab meat, ketchup, vinegar, mayonnaise and meat balls, Gluten is added to a lot of things you wouldn’t really expect.   Oats may or may not have gluten. French fries are made out of potato. But before they’re frozen they are actually sprinkled with wheat flour so they don’t stick to each other.  A lot of cosmetics have gluten. Medications, play dough, some shampoos, some vitamin supplements have gluten.  There are a lot of things that are code words for gluten. Sometimes they’ll put it as the genus species of the actual plant. There will be hidden gluten. Keep in mind that gluten free does not mean low carb. It could actually mean high carb.

Gluten sensitivity can cause all kinds of symptoms. From a GI standpoint, they can be somewhat similar symptoms as true celiac disease but not quite as dramatic. The GI symptoms are: abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, GERD, gas, stomatitis, and mouth ulcers.  There are also symptoms of gluten sensitivity that have nothing to do with the GI system such as:  migraines, brain fog, fatigue, fibromyalgia, joint/muscle pain, numbness, eczema, skin rashes, depression, anxiety, anemia, folate deficiency, asthma, rhinitis, and eating disorders.  There are neurologic symptoms. Gluten can set off schizophrenia. It could be a factor in autism, peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, ADD, and ADHD. We see this diagnosed all the time nowadays. It actually could be a gluten problem.

There are some antibody tests to diagnose for gluten sensitivity. However, they’re going to miss a lot of people.  The only good way is a diagnosis of exclusion.  You remove gluten from your diet for at least a month and then try and reintroduce it. If your symptoms come back, it’s probably due to gluten. It’s not the most scientific thing in the world to do but it actually works pretty well. It’s like an elimination diet.  The treatment is a gluten free diet.  Those with gluten sensitivity often have the false impression that “cutting back” is helpful, but really need to avoid all gluten. I want everyone to keep in mind that if you eliminate gluten, no nutritional deficiency will occur.

It’s really amazing some of the symptoms that can be related to gluten sensitivity. I already mentioned a lot of them. Some other symptoms are: autoimmune disorders (rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, Hashimoto’s), bone pain, cancer,   heart disease, infertility, dental problems, skin problems, and more.  Gluten sensitivity can have a lot of things to do with things you never expect. The only way to know is getting rid of the gluten. Obviously we think of gastrointestinal problems associated with gluten sensitivity.

Unfortunately there are no real standards for testing gluten intolerance.  The simple way to do it is to get rid of the gluten. We can measure anti-gliadin antibody (IgA) in the blood or stool. If you measured everyone’s blood, 12% have antibodies to anti-gliadin.  There are 30% in the stool. It can cause an immune reaction. If something causes an immune reaction there can be damage. The reaction is usually an inflammatory reaction. Cytokines develop and are released. The Gold Standard is gluten free for 1 month, then re-introduce. If symptoms pop up, then you are sensitive to gluten.

Gluten-free should not mean eating all the junk/processed food that is labeled as gluten free.  It doesn’t correlate with low carb. The “Core Diet” is just 3 things: hydration (water), good protein sources, and salad stuff. That’s what you should eat. Get rid of most everything else. Do I agree with trying to keep a gluten-free diet??? Absolutely!

I have more to say about gluten and I’ll post another article next week.  We’ll delve into this more and look at all the major body organs that can be affected by gluten sensitivity. I’ll go into a little more detail with that.

If you think of questions, don’t hesitate to call (757-873-1880), text or stop by. This is something that’s really common. I think this is something that’s going to become more and more important. Part of the problem is that the wheat that’s being grown now is not the same wheat that was grown 100 years ago. It was genetically modified (GMO’s). You hear about GMO’s all the time. The problem with GMO’s is whether they’ve been tested for safety.

Remember to stop by and get your body comp checked.

Remember, it’s your life. Make it a healthy one.

Crustless Spinach Quiche

Posted on September 13, 2019 by

A brunch favorite filled with flavor! 

Ingredients
6 eggs
10 oz pkg frozen spinach, thawed & drained
1 medium onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 Tbls butter
½ green olives, sliced
1 tsp red pepper flakes
2 cups shredded cheddar (I use the Mexican blend)
Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray large (9”) quiche dish with cooking spray.
  2. Saute onions & garlic in butter until softened. Stir in spinach and cook until heated through. Remove from heat.
  3. Add olives and pepper flakes.
  4. Whisk eggs and stir into spinach mixture.
  5. Stir in cheese and pour into baking dish. Sprinkle a little more cheese on top if desired.
  6. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until eggs are set and edges turn slightly brown.
  7. Remove and allow to cool before serving.

Makes 6 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories                       171
Total Fat                      10g
Total Carbohydrates      5g
Dietary Fiber               1.5g
Protein                         17g

Print Recipe: Spinach Crustless Quiche

A Bit About Micronutrients

Posted on August 19, 2019 by

Let’s do a Micronutrient Overview. They are different from macronutrients, which are what give us calories or energy. Those are fat, protein, and carbohydrate. Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals. We’ll go over what the key vitamins and minerals are and what are the components of a good multivitamin. We’ll talk about pharmacy grade vs over the counter (OTC). And, finally, what do I recommend?

Micronutrients are the vitamins and minerals your body requires in small amounts to keep you functioning properly. We can’t live without these things. Some of them we can’t store well so we need those daily. Some of them we can store for a certain period of time. A vitamin deficiency is not something that happens in a day. It occurs over a long period of time. They are essential, non-caloric nutrients that assist our body in biochemical equations. They make the biochemical equations run more efficiently. Minerals are elements also needed in your body. Most of them can be obtained from food.  Vitamins are typically divided into two groups: water soluble (B-complex and C) and fat soluble (A, D, E, and K).

We’ll start with the Fat Soluble Vitamins. Vitamin A and most of these vitamins are better taken in combinations. Any one vitamin by itself won’t do you a whole lot. For example, Vit D is best taken in combination with Vit A and Vit K. All the vitamins work in synergy with each other. Vit A is very important in vision. It’s also very important in maintaining the eyes and skin, but also bone and tooth growth as well as immunity. There typically isn’t one thing that each vitamin does. They’re involved in lots of different things.

Vitamin D has gotten a lot of publicity in the media over the past few years. It’s very important in bone health. It aids in bone mineralization by increasing calcium absorption. Many years ago the thought was we had to take massive doses of calcium when what we really needed was Vit D. Very likely most of us get in plenty of calcium. The problem is in the absorption because we’re not getting enough Vit D.  Half the American population runs low on Vitamin D. Close to 90% of my weight loss patients run low on Vit. D. It’s close to 95% of the surgical patients. The higher someone’s weight, the more likely they are going to be vitamin D deficient.  Vitamin D is very important in weight maintenance or weight preservation. When you have low Vitamin D there is a very close association that people with low levels have a much harder time losing weight and a much easier time gaining weight. It actually acts more like a hormone than a vitamin because it does so many different things. It helps prevent certain cancers, heart disease, and neuropsychological problems. If someone asks me what vitamins to take I always start out by saying a good multivitamin. I also tell just about everybody they need extra Vitamin D. It doesn’t matter if you’ve had surgery or not. In theory you can overdose on Vitamin D. You’d have to take massive doses. If you take it with Vitamin A and Vitamin K, you can’t actually overdose on it because they work in synergy. They help each other out.

Vitamin E is a very important antioxidant. It protects cell membranes and helps reduce tissue inflammation. There’s getting to be some evidence that massive doses of Vit E aren’t very helpful either. It could potentially cause other problems.

Vitamin K is very important in blood clotting and prevents abnormal bone formation. You don’t just want to form bone, but you want to form good, healthy and strong bone.

Water Soluble Vitamins are Vitamin C and B vitamins. Vitamin C is also an extremely important antioxidant. It helps maintain connective tissue, supports the immune system, and boosts iron absorption. Connective tissue is what holds us together. It holds the muscle to the bones and the bones to the bones. Vitamin C deficiency is scurvy back hundreds of years ago. People were falling apart. Old scars were actually falling apart. It caused loose and lax joints. If you’re iron deficient, taking iron with Vit C will actually help absorb it.

There are 8 different B Vitamins: thiamine, niacin, riboflavin, folate, B6, B12, biotin and pantothenic acid. They aid in energy metabolism by helping the body metabolize carbs, protein and fats. We often think of the B vitamins as energy vitamins. B vitamins themselves don’t give you energy. What they do is make the energy producing equations run much more efficiently. Symptoms of low B Vitamins: exhaustion, irritability, anemia, depression, forgetfulness, loss of appetite, skin problems, and impaired immunity. Immunity pops up all the time with most of the vitamins.

Let’s talk about minerals. They are inorganic, non-caloric substances that your body requires in small amounts to ensure proper functioning. We need them to help run those biochemical reactions and for structure. They perform a number of essential duties including maintaining water balance, assisting muscular contraction, and transmitting nerve impulses. Minerals are extremely important and each of them does different things.

Calcium is the most common mineral in our body because it’s bone formation. It’s essential for bone formation, water balance regulation, muscle contraction and relaxation, BP maintenance, and secretion of essential enzymes and hormones. If you don’t have calcium you’d go into tetanus where all your muscles contract. One of the blood pressure medications works as a calcium channel blocker. It helps to lower blood pressure. But in order to maintain our blood pressure we need calcium. It also helps in the secretions of essential enzymes and hormones.

Phosphorus goes along with Calcium. It’s important in bone mineralization and energy metabolism. It’s also the “money” of our overall energy metabolism because our overall energy is measured in ATP (adenosine triphosphate-which is phosphorus).  We can’t have energy without phosphorus.

Magnesium is very important in bone function but also muscle function. I recommend just about everybody needs extra magnesium. It functions is about 3 or 400 different equations throughout your body. One of the more important ones is muscle function. If you’re prone to muscle cramps or muscle soreness magnesium is one of the best things you can take. It also helps to keep bowels regular. It’s a working ingredient in milk of magnesia. If you take magnesium palates it will help bowels stay more regular. It can help with muscle function in the intestinal tract (which is a muscle).

People are often very careful about their sodium content. We can’t live without sodium. We would die very quickly without salt. It helps maintain a pH balance. It’s also essential in muscle and nerve function. It regulates our body water as well as blood pressure.

We also can’t live without potassium. It maintains fluid & electrolyte balance, assists in nerve function, and muscle contraction. It people have low potassium their muscle contraction will be very poor. They often think about taking bananas if they have cramps. Typically that’s a magnesium problem, not potassium.

Iodine is essential for thyroid function. Most people don’t get enough iodine. It used to be added in all kinds of food. It’s been taken out of almost all food and replaced with bromine. Bromine has been taken off the market in Europe because it’s potentially a toxin. Potentially these toxins have been added to our food. Now most Americans don’t get enough iodine anymore. There’s a little bit in iodized salt but not enough to really matter.

Iron helps carry oxygen in blood and required for energy metabolism. We can’t live without iron. Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies. It’s more common in young women, especially if they’re having heavier cycles. Symptoms of iron deficiency include fatigue, weakness, and impaired immunity. Again, immunity pops in there. If you’re low on iron, it’s hard to maintain immune function.

We talk about immune function with zinc. You often see it advertised on TV. If you think you’re coming down with a cold or exposed to a cold than you take high dose zinc.  They sell a bunch of products, but what they’re based on is high dose zinc. Zinc helps activate many enzymes. Most people could use extra zinc anyway. It also can help improve testosterone function. Magnesium also helps with testosterone function.

Chromium is also a mineral we talk about all the time when talk about cravings. It can regulate blood sugar swings. It works closely with insulin to regulate and release energy from glucose. Low levels impair insulin activity. Just having low levels of chromium means insulin won’t do what it normally needs to do as effectively.

What are the components of a good multivitamin? There are a lot of brands out there.  Let the buyer beware because the FDA does not regulate multivitamins. A good multivitamin should provide all the items and doses close or exceeding the RDA (recommended daily allowance). You just have to remember the RDA is the absolute minimum amount which will help prevent a deficiency syndrome.  It has nothing to do with an optimal dose. Some people are afraid there will be a problem if they take more than the RDA. Absolutely not!!  For most nutrients the actual optimal dose is unknown. The other end of the spectrum is that there’s probably not a whole lot of benefit of taking 5000% of what the RDA is. It’s probably somewhat superfluous.

The pharmaceutical grade vs OTC. Pharmaceutical grade vitamins basically mean they’re made under the conditions set forth by the American Board of Pharmacy. This means that, hopefully, you can really trust its content as well as ensure the best absorption and utilization. It’s very important that vitamins need to be absorbed well.  Your body has to utilize it. I encourage people to use pharmaceutical grade when buying vitamins. If you’re not going to use pharmaceutical grade vitamins I would recommend choosing a vitamin from a corporation that made its name making vitamins. This is what the company does. An example would be One a Day or Centrum. I don’t recommend using generic vitamins because you have no idea what’s really in them. Labels may look exactly the same between a pharmaceutical grade and an OTC. But, that doesn’t mean that’s what’s inside there.  There may be a lot of things in there that you don’t want. OTC vitamins and minerals are not held to the same high standards. There have been a number of studies that show content may not match what is listed on the bottle. Let the buyer beware.

We have pharmaceutical grade vitamins in our store. It does guarantee that what you’re getting is what you pay for. Just about everybody ought to take a multivitamin. The main reason is the typical American diet just doesn’t get what it really needs to get. Even if we’re trying to eat as healthy as possible (green and clean), part of the problem is a lot of the soil has been contaminated. And we also can’t get all the vitamins and minerals from the soil anymore. I encourage just about everyone to take Vit D. Other important vitamins and minerals are the essential fatty acids (EFA’s), B-Complex, magnesium/potassium, calcium (if you’re getting Vit D you’re probably getting enough Calcium), chromium, chelated iron (the iron molecules on this chelated iron are connected to a couple amino acids. They are more efficiently absorbed. Therefore you can take a smaller dose, which can reduce some of the side effects), and potentially a carb blocker (can decrease the amount of carbohydrate that’s absorbed and keeping the carbohydrate low by converting the carbohydrate that would have been absorbed into a non-absorbable carbohydrate. It’s turned into a fiber which can subsequently help with constipation).

If you have questions don’t hesitate to pick up the phone, text us (757-873-1880) or send us an email: success@cfwls.com

Chicken Diablo

Posted on August 13, 2019 by

You can make it as spicy as you want – I like it hot!

Ingredients
2 chicken breast halves, cut into 1-2” chunks
1 red or yellow bell pepper, diced
1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 cup Mexican cheese blend, shredded
1 package frozen riced cauliflower
10 oz can of Rotel (any style you like) or 1 cup salsa
1 pkg of creamy chicken protein soup mix
½ cup hot water

Directions

  1. Thaw cauliflower and spread in the bottom of casserole dish.
  2. Top with chunks of chicken, pepper and black beans.
  3. Stir soup mix with hot water until mixed and add tomatoes/salsa (not drained).
  4. Pour over entire casserole.
  5. Sprinkle with cheese and bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.
  6. Serve with sour cream if desired.

Makes 6 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories                                 135
Total Fat                                  3g
Total Carbohydrates             7.5g
Dietary Fiber                        1.5g
Protein                                  18g

Note: Try using green beans in place of riced cauliflower for a bit of variation!

Print Recipe: Chicken Diablo

Lime and Cilantro Shrimp Skillet

Posted on July 12, 2019 by

Tangy & tasty with a hint of smoke!

Ingredients|
1 Tbls olive oil
1 Tbls butter
2 limes, sliced thin
4 cloves garlic, minced or crushed
1 tsp smoked paprika
½ tsp red pepper flakes (if desired)
½ cup white wine
2 lb large shrimp (peeled & deveined with tails)
1 Tbls Fresh ground pepper
½ Tbls Sea salt
½ cup fresh cilantro, chopped

Package of riced cauliflower – cooked

Directions

  1. Heat oil over medium to high heat and allow to coat the bottom of the cast iron skillet.
  2. Add butter and heat until it bubbles.
  3. Add lime slices and garlic. Cook for 30-45 seconds.
  4. Add paprika, salt, peppers & wine and allow to simmer for 2-3 minutes to reduce by half.
  5. Add the shrimp and stir often allowing it to cook until pink. Remove from skillet and plate.
  6. Serve with riced cauliflower and sprinkle with more cilantro if desired.

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts: (not including cauliflower)
Calories                       255
Total Fat                            8g
Total Carbohydrates    2.5g
Dietary Fiber                0g
Protein                                        34g

Print Recipe: Lime and Cilantro Shrimp Skillet

Strawberry No-Bake Cheesecake – Low Carb Too!

Posted on July 03, 2019 by

Cool & creamy dessert for those special occasions – like tonight!

Ingredients:

nonstick cooking spray
¾ cup almond meal or almond flour
2 tablespoons butter, melted
3 cups strawberries, sliced
2 envelopes protein strawberry-banana gelatin
3 envelopes unflavored gelatin
2 cups cold water, divided
32 oz cream cheese, softened
1 ¼ cups sugar substitute, divided
1 teaspoon lemon juice
½ cup almond milk (soy or coconut work well too)
⅔ cup hot water
1 cup diet sprite or any sparkling water

Directions:

  1. Spray the sides of an 8” or 9” springform pan and line bottom with parchment paper.
  2. Combine almond meal, ¼ cup of sugar substitute and melted butter until crumbly.
  3. Transfer the crumb mixture to the springform pan. Use a spatula or back of spoon to press down to form a base. Chill for 10 minutes.
  4. In a small bowl, combine 1 cup cold water, 1 envelope of protein gelatin and 2 envelopes of unflavored gelatin. Let bloom for 3 minutes, until the water is mostly absorbed. Microwave for 20–30 seconds, or until the gelatin is melted.
  5. In a large bowl, beat the cream cheese, 1 cup sugar substitute and lemon juice together with an electric hand mixer until combined.
  6. Add the milk and melted gelatin and beat for another 1-2 minutes, until fluffy & well combined.
  7. Spread cheesecake mixture over the chilled crust. Chill for 10 minutes.
  8. In a small bowl, combine the remaining 1 cup cold water with the remaining 2 envelopes (1 plain & 1 flavored) of gelatin. Let the gelatin bloom for 3 minutes. Microwave 20–30 seconds, until the gelatin is melted.
  9. Add 1 cup sparkling water or diet soda slowly and stir to combine. Let sit for 5 minutes to cool slightly. Skim off foam and set aside.
  10. Arrange the sliced strawberries over the cheesecake layer in a circular pattern with the flat sides facing out. Begin with the larger slices near the outside and continue toward center until filled.
  11. Spoon half of the gelatin over the strawberries. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Pour the remaining gelatin over the berries. Refrigerate for several hours.
  12. Release the springform and remove the parchment – then slice & serve.

Serves 16

Nutritional Info:
Calories:               195
Fat:                          14g
Carbohydrates:     5g
Fiber:                        1g
Protein:                    8g

Print Recipe: Strawberry No-Bake Cheesecake

Golden Mahi Mahi with Citrus Slaw

Posted on June 28, 2019 by

A delicious blen of sweet & savory that’s bound to become a favorite!

Ingredients
Fish:
1 lb mahi mahi filets
1 ½ tsp paprika
1 tsp brown sugar
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp chili powder
¼ tsp oregano
Salt & pepper to taste
1 Tbls olive oil

Slaw:
1 6 oz. package cole slaw mix with carrots
¼ red pepper, sliced thin
½ cup green onions, sliced
2 Tbls lime juice + zest
1 Tbls honey
1 clove garlic, minced
2 Tbls olive oil
¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped

Directions

  1. Combine spices & sugar in shallow dish and mix thoroughly.
  2. Coat both sides of mahi filets.
  3. Heat olive oil in cast iron skillet to medium-high heat.
  4. Add fish and allow to cook until golden on one side, then turn gently.
  5. Fish is done when it flakes easily. Remove from heat and plate.
  6. Combine slaw mix, pepper & onion together.
  7. Combine remaining ingredients in a small bowl and whisk to mix.
  8. Pour over slaw mix and toss. Serve next to fish.

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories                       285
Total Fat                      12g
Total Carbohydrates    16g
Dietary Fiber                3g
Protein                        36g

Print Recipe:  Golden Mahi Mahi with Citrus Slaw