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Tag Archives: weight loss newport news

Low Carb Shrimp Sushi Bowl

Posted on September 11, 2020 by

A colorful dish that’s filled with flavors!

Ingredients
1 lb cooked shrimp, chilled
1 avocado, sliced
½ cucumber, sliced thin
1 green onion, sliced
4-6 sheets nori, sliced into ribbons
Black or toasted sesame seeds to sprinkle
1 package frozen riced cauliflower
2 Tbls rice vinegar
¼ cup mayo
2-3 tsp Sriracha sauce

Directions
1. Thaw shrimp and chill.
2. Heat riced cauliflower to package instructions. Stir in vinegar & mix well. Divide into bowls and allow to cool.
3. Mix mayo with Sriracha sauce and spoon into plastic bag. Seal & cut small tip off one side to drizzle.
4. Arrange shrimp, avocado slices, cucumber slices, green onion & nori on top of riced cauliflower.
5. Drizzle spicy mayo over entire bowl and sprinkle with black sesame seeds.

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories 358
Total Fat 18g
Total Carbohydrates 19g
Dietary Fiber 10g
Protein 31g

Print Recipe: Low Carb Shrimp Sushi Bowl

Turkey Slider Lettuce Wraps

Posted on September 04, 2020 by

These tasty little burgers make a great appetizer or small plate meal!

Ingredients
1 lb ground turkey
1 tsp lemon zest
1 tsp lime zest
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 green onions, sliced thin
1 Tbls olive oil
1 head Bibb or Butter lettuce
Slivered carrot or herbs for garnish

Directions
1. Mix ground turkey, lemon and lime zest, garlic and onions together.
2. Shape into small 1 ½-2” patties.
3. Heat olive oil in heavy skillet over medium high heat. Place patties in hot oil and cook about 2 minutes or until browned. Flip over and repeat.
4. Serve on lettuce leaves.
5. I generally have small bowls of Sriracha sauce or mustard to add if desired.

Makes 16 sliders

Nutrition Facts:
Calories 60
Total Fat 4g
Total Carbohydrates 1g
Dietary Fiber 0g
Protein 8g

Print Recipe: Turkey Slider Lettuce Wraps

Easy Ranch Chicken Kabobs

Posted on August 28, 2020 by

When you’re looking for a quick and easy weeknight meal!

Ingredients
1 lb chicken tenders (about 8)
1 envelope dry Ranch dressing mix
1 Tbls olive oil
1 Tbls white wine vinegar
8 6” skewers

Directions
1. Pour dressing mix, olive oil & vinegar into a 1 quart resealable bag. Mix together well.
2. Add chicken tenders and seal bag. Shake to coat and refrigerate for 1-2 hours.
3. Thread 2 tenders onto each skewer.
4. Grill over medium heat (turning once) until done.

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories 180
Total Fat 6.3g
Total Carbohydrates 1g
Dietary Fiber 0g
Protein 24g

Print Recipe: Easy Ranch Chicken Kabobs

Low Carb Zuppa Toscana

Posted on August 18, 2020 by

Every bit of the flavor & textures without the carbs!

Ingredients
1 lb Italian turkey sausage (I used spicy)
1 medium onion, diced
1 rib celery, sliced
1 small green pepper, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
16 oz package frozen cauliflower florets (or 1 lb head fresh)
6 cups chicken broth
6 cups kale, torn into bite-sized bits
½ cup half & half
Salt & pepper

Directions
1. Brown ground meat and add onions, celery, garlic & peppers. Saute until veggies are softened.
2. Add cauliflower & chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes or until cauliflower is tender.
3. Add kale and cook until tender.
4. Stir in half & half.
5. Serve hot!

Makes 4-6 servings

Nutrition Facts: (for 6 servings)
Calories 205
Total Fat 5.5g
Total Carbohydrates 16g
Dietary Fiber 3g
Protein 24g

Print Recipe: Low Carb Zuppa Toscana

Grilled Pesto Shrimp Kabobs

Posted on August 14, 2020 by

Pair shrimp kabobs with a fresh garden salad and a slice of melon!

Ingredients
1 lb jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
1 clove garlic
¼ cup shredded parmesan cheese
3 Tbls olive oil
Salt & pepper

Directions

  1. Toss basil leaves, garlic, parmesan, olive oil and seasonings together in the bowl of a food processor and pulse until blended smooth.
  2. Combine raw shrimp with pesto and allow to marinate for an hour. (I don’t always have an hour and it still tastes great)
  3. Soak 4 wooden skewers in water for 20-30 minutes. Thread shrimp onto skewers and place on metal outdoor grill pan.
  4. Cook over medium-hot grill until shrimp turn pink. Remove from heat immediately to avoid over-cooking. 6-8 minutes should be enough.
  5. Garnish with fresh basil & extra shredded parmesan if desired.

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories         220
Total Fat          13g
Total Carbohydrates  1g
Dietary Fiber       0g
Protein           25g

Print Recipe: Grilled Pesto Shrimp Kabobs

Tomato & Spinach Frittatas

Posted on July 27, 2020 by

For breakfast, brunch or appetizers!

Ingredients
2 cups baby spinach
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes, drained
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup shredded cheddar cheese
10 eggs
¼ cup milk
Salt & pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Spray muffin tin with cooking spray.
  2. Divide spinach, tomatoes & cheese in the muffin cups.
  3. Mix eggs, garlic, milk and salt & pepper in large bowl and whisk together.
  4. Pour mixture evenly into each cup.
  5. Bake for 25 minutes.

Makes 12 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories         82
Total Fat          5.4g
Total Carbohydrates  2.3g
Dietary Fiber       .6g
Protein           6.4g

Print Recipe: Tomato and Spinach Fritattas

Cauliflower Cheese Soup

Posted on March 13, 2020 by

Wholesome goodness – substantial enough on it’s own or serve it with a salad 😊

Ingredients
1 small head cauliflower, broken into flowerets
1 cup shredded carrot
1 stalk celery, diced fine
1 small onion, diced fine
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup water
½ cup chicken broth
1 packet protein Cheese Dip mix
½ cup half and half
½ cup shredded cheddar cheese
Bacon bits for garnish
Green onion for garnish

Directions

  1. Cook cauliflower, carrots, celery, onion & garlic in 1 cup of water until cauliflower is tender. Remove from heat and mash with potato masher.
  2. Prepare Cheese Dip mix according to directions for soup. Add to cauliflower mixture.
  3. Add chicken broth and half & half. Return to heat and bring to a simmer. Stir in ½ cup shredded cheddar cheese.
  4. Serve with bacon bits and green onion garnish (if desired).

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories                                  165
Total Fat                                   9g
Total Carbohydrates               11g
Dietary Fiber                            3g
Protein                                    11g

Print Recipe: Cauliflower Cheese Soup

Look for this new product in the store!

Mentally Preparing for Weight Loss Surgery

Posted on March 02, 2020 by

Getting your mind in the right place before undertaking any weight loss plan is a good idea but it is especially important when considering a surgical weight loss procedure.  Awhile ago, I interviewed Dr. Dawn Reese for one of my podcasts.  We’ve transcribed the recording to post for you today.

Dr. Clark:  “Dr. Reese, tell us a little bit about your background and how you got involved with me.”

Dr. Reese:  “Thanks for having me back. I love being here. I love talking with you. We’ve been together now about 10 years. I met you in the hospital and we talked about doing this. I have a PhD in clinical psychology. My specialty is behavioral health (health psychology). I try to help people live healthier lives and do more with their lives then what they want. When you and I first met we talked about what you wanted to do with these surgeries and medical weight loss program. That was right up my alley. We can help people live healthier and take better care of themselves. This is what we need to talk about today when getting ready for surgery or a medical program.”

Dr. Clark: “We have to change our mindset. What do we need to work most on when we start contemplating a weight loss plan or having surgery?”

Dr. Reese: “People have to take care of themselves first. That’s the biggest thing with all of this. That’s the umbrella that we’re going to put everything else under. You have to start taking care of yourself first and start thinking about yourself first. One of your goals for weight loss is to change your mindset. How are you going to view yourself differently? How are you going to view yourself as a priority?”

Dr. Clark: “That priority and that mindset are very important. Eighty five percent of my surgical clients are women. They’re often worried about taking care of everyone else first.  They put themselves on the backburner. We need to start planning for shifting that mindset before surgery. Make yourself a priority.”

Dr. Reese: “We start people having a mind shift (fake it til you make it).  For example, you start using the smaller plate. Join the gym. I had a patient come in to my office and tell me he was going to join the gym after surgery. I told him we were going to start tomorrow. You start doing these things now and behaving as if you’ve started your medical or surgical weight loss. Think about how you’re going to plan and cook differently. Get mentally and behaviorally prepared.”

Dr. Clark: “A huge part of this is planning. You alluded to this when talking about the person going to the gym. You need to start implementing that plan even if you’re not able to do much at the gym. Get comfortable with walking in the gym and walking by the class you would like to do. Watch it for a couple minutes. Setting that time aside makes it much more likely that it’s going to happen afterwards. We want to develop skillsets before and after surgery. It could be eating skills or activity skills.”

Dr. Reese:  “Planning is going to be key. How are you going to live your life differently? What are you going to change every day in your life so that you make yourself a priority? Make a list of what your goals are for that day. Preparing people around you is important. If you’re the cook of the family, how is that going to change? Mentally prepare on how this is going to impact other people and how that will make you feel. We have a joke in psychology:  it doesn’t take 20 days to create a habit. It takes a little longer than that. Getting mentally prepared and behaviorally implementing it is so very important. For anything, planning is the key.”

Dr. Clark: “If my norm is getting together with my best friend on Friday nights and going to a movie, that might also include getting a big bucket of popcorn or other snacks. That’s a great part of life. We want to keep doing it, but we have to change some of the aspects. It isn’t that simple to make that change.”

Dr. Reese: “What you’re talking about is really important in terms of mentally rehearsing.  You can imagine yourself at the movies but not having that popcorn.  How is that going to look? How is that going to feel? When we are preparing athletes for an event, we have them imagine themselves in their role.  If you’re an offensive lineman in football we have you imagine doing what you’ll be doing on the field before you even go on the field. That’s a great thing we can do here. How is it going to be Friday night at the movies? What is that going to look like? Mentally rehearsing is wonderful.”

Dr. Clark: “You have to mentally walk yourself through daily situations. Most of us have a routine we go through. I have a routine. I get up in the morning and shower and shave. I can literally write it out. What I find is that if my routine gets thrown off, my whole day starts to fall apart. I might have just told a patient who just had surgery to change their routine. You then have to think about how that will change everything else in your day. A lot of times people don’t think about a disruption or change in schedule. Then, when their routine changes (which causes stress) they revert back to old comfort levels. What does a person do?”

Dr. Reese: “You’re absolutely right. It’s stressful when we don’t have a normal routine. When people get stressed, we’re going to fall back into old patterns. We go back to things that are comfortable to us. We have to start planning. We need to think about what it is that we’re going to do even if we get stressed. How can I not fall back into that pattern and admit to ourselves that it happens? It’s not bad. It’s not good. It’s not anything. It’s just what happens. It’s not a failure. If you plan for it, you’re less likely to fall back into old patterns. You’re more likely to be able to get a new routine going.”

Dr. Clark: “You want to practice these things ahead of time so you’re ready for surgery. It sounds good and you have your plan in place. However, sometimes things don’t work out quite like we want them to. What you do is discuss how to handle things at this point. A major part of what you do is help people figure some of this out. What do we do? How do we change? It really still goes back to the mindset. This is a lot of what you do, right?”

Dr. Reese: “Absolutely! We want you to be successful. If you’re going to start a behavior change, especially weight loss, we don’t want you to be a failure.”

Dr. Clark: “The big message here is changing that mindset. We want to plan for it and practice it ahead of time. It doesn’t matter whether we’re talking about having surgery or starting on your weight loss plan. Things have to change. Change will never occur if you don’t actually change. You can’t wait for change to happen to you. You’ve got to be an active part of all this. Typically the change that happens to us is usually not a good change. We would like to be an active participant. We really want you to think about that message.”

Creamy Shrimp with Mushrooms and Spinach

Posted on January 31, 2020 by

It doesn’t get much better than this!

Ingredients
1 lb raw shrimp, peeled & deveined
8 oz baby bell mushrooms
3 oz baby spinach
2 Tbls butter
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp dried basil
½ cup chicken broth
½ cup half & half
2 tsp arrowroot powder (or cornstarch)
Salt & pepper to taste
1/2 cup parmesan cheese

Directions
1. Toss shrimp with salt & pepper, sprinkle with basil.
2. Melt 1 Tbls butter in skillet and cook shrimp over medium heat until pink, turning to cook evenly on both sides. Remove from skillet.
3. Melt remaining butter in skillet and add garlic. Saute and add chicken broth and spinach.
4. Combine half & half with arrowroot powder and pour over wilted spinach. Stir mixture until it starts to thicken.
5. Stir in parmesan cheese and cook until cheese is melted.
6. Toss in shrimp and stir to coat.
7. Sprinkle with basil and serve.

Makes 4 servings

Nutrition Facts:
Calories 276
Total Fat 13g
Total Carbohydrates 8g
Dietary Fiber 1g
Protein 32g

Print recipe: creamy shrimp with mushrooms and spinach

Food Triggers & Dietary Disasters

Posted on January 13, 2020 by

A lot of times emotions can turn on that “feeding frenzy.” Or, sometimes situations will turn it on. Certain foods will call your name. We all seem to have our own triggers. We also have our own cravings. A trigger is something that sets in motion a course of events. Here we’re talking about eating when we don’t necessarily want to eat or should be eating. Eating triggers fall into 3 categories: trigger foods, trigger feelings, and trigger environments.

A trigger food is a specific food that sets off a course of overeating. Is there some food that you can only have a tiny bit and then you need to eat everything in sight? Control is often lost and excessive amounts of food may be consumed. Common trigger foods are usually highly refined foods such as sugar/fat combinations like ice cream. Another common trigger food is salty/starchy combination such as bread, chips, or crackers. I’m not a big fan of diet deprivation. I don’t believe in saying, “You can never eat this…” You’ll typically want it even more if you think you can never have it. If you want it even more it makes it harder to leave it alone. Can we be satisfied with a little bit? That’s what you want to strive for. If there truly is a food that causes you to eat the whole thing (whole bag of chips) then you probably should avoid that food. It’s the food, not the emotion that triggers the out of control eating. It’s not the situation.

Physiologic cravings are real. They tend to be most pronounced with high carb foods such as cookies, breads, pastries, and chips. They usually peak during the first few weeks of dieting. Then they fade. But you can experience true withdrawal symptoms. Carbohydrates are like a drug. If you have a little bit you’re going to want more. The symptoms are worsening cravings, headaches, fatigue, shakiness, and irritability. Once you get through the withdrawal symptoms it gets easier but that doesn’t make it easy. Many cravings are related to blood sugar swings. Every time the blood sugar comes down you’re going to want more because your body wants something to keep that blood sugar from dropping. Consequently you’re going to get a big swing up if you have more of that food. The big blood sugar swings make the cravings even worse. Appetite suppressants can help. Chromium can also help. It’s a mineral and can help smooth over blood sugar swings. You can get it just about anywhere. We sell it here in our nutrition store. On the bottle it will say take one a day as a supplement. Unfortunately that doesn’t work for cravings. Generally you need to take it 3 times a day. It’s very safe but you shouldn’t take a bottle every day!

A trigger feeling is an emotion (good or bad) which sets off a period of overeating. Examples are stress, anxiety, anger, sadness, or loneliness. It often sets off overeating of just about any food (salty, crunchy, sweet, doughy, etc.….). Identifying the emotion is key to controlling these triggers. Journaling is one of the best ways to sort this out. It’s not just writing down what you’re eating. It’s writing down why you’re eating. If you’re hungry and it’s time to eat then that’s a good reason. What if it’s not time to eat? If you’re not hungry, what are the reasons? Am I stressed? Am I excited? Am I depressed? You’ll see a pattern developing.

Trigger environments are specific situations or places that set off an episode of overeating (Movie Theater, buffet, sporting event, socializing with a specific group of friends).  The overeating is set off by the specific environment or situation. Usually you regret it the next day. To manage this you have to identify the specific location, people, or events. Avoidance works, but often that’s not possible. Are you really never going to the movies again? Are you really going to avoid your friends? It’s important to develop strategies to minimize the overeating in those environments. Plan ahead of time what you’re going to do. It’s hard to unlearn things but we have to.

We all have willpower even though we don’t think we do. Some of us need to take it up a notch. Cravings tend to fade with time. They can come back. The internal struggle with cravings leads to emotional pain. It’s often due to indecision. We really haven’t made up our mind. We literally make thousands of eating decisions every day. With fasting you get rid of a lot of decisions. Make the hard and fast decision that you won’t give in to the craving. To weaken the intensity and reduce the craving you must stop giving in to them. It’s easier said than done but it does work. Avoiding the indecision can be very helpful. Willpower is like a muscle. It can be strengthened with practice.

Your Strategies for Improving Willpower

There are strategies for improving willpower. The first strategy is Mindset Changing Techniques. You need to be truthful with yourself. Tell yourself it’s a craving, not true hunger. Is there another reason you’re eating (angry, lonely, tired, and stressed)? Don’t waiver in your commitment. It will get easier with time. We want to imagine the aftermath of giving in. Sometimes when we give in it feels good to eat that sugary food for a few minutes. You might even get a sugar high. But typically, a little later, you’re not going to feel so good. Replace the word can’t with won’t. You always have a choice.  Review your goals and remind yourself why you’re doing this. Why do you want to continue with this weight loss process? If you give in all the time, you’re always going to be at risk for gaining weight.

The second strategy for improving willpower is Habit Changing Techniques. You want to distance yourself from the food you crave. Remove the food or yourself from the scene. Remove the food or distance yourself from the scene. For example, don’t go to the movies for a while. When you go back, don’t revert back to the big tub of buttered popcorn, bring some protein snack along with you instead.  Drink something. Thirst is often confused with hunger. If you drink something you often realize you weren’t hungry. Your body will tell you that you need something. It could be just the water that it needs.  Try to change your mindset. Relax. Set a timer for 5 minutes and concentrate on breathing. Distract yourself: brush your teeth (how many people want to eat after they’ve brushed their teeth?), paint your nails, brisk walk, exercise, call a friend, shower, practice a musical instrument, or work in the yard. Do something that will distract you for a period of time and the cravings will fade away.

In summation, food trigger are all around you. Learn to recognize them for what they are. Develop the strategies to combat them. It will get you that much closer to your weight loss goals! If you need help, we offer counseling for anyone that’s struggling with that. The counselors will figure out a solution for you. Contact us at 757-873-1880 and set up a free consultation to figure out which program or plan fits your needs!