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I Am Prone to OverEating!

Posted on July 28, 2014 by

on your plateMost people consider overeating as a single event such as a meal or a party but there are numerous ways to overeat.  Not really listening to your hunger level is of course one method of overeating.  Others may be related more to mindless eating:

 

 

You eat too fast not allowing your body to signal the “I’m full” message.

Try:

  • Waiting about 5 minutes before you start eating (look and smell).
  • Put your utensils down between each bite.
  • Chew your food slowly, noting the texture and taste.
  • If you are eating multiple courses take a five to ten minute break between each course.
  • Use smaller utensils so you pick up smaller amounts.
  • Set a clock at your place setting and stretch your meal out to 30 minutes.

You have portion control problems.

Try:

  • Use a smaller a plate, such as bread or salad plate.
  • Measure and weigh your food.
  • Have your spouse or friend serve your plate.
  • Avoid family style table serving.
  • Get up from the table as soon as you finish eating.

You sample your food while cooking.

Try:

  • Chew gum while cooking.
  • Place the sample on your plate as part of your meal.
  • Ask a family member to taste it for you.
  • Allow other family members to prepare the meal.

You eat or snack while watching television.

Try:

  • Eating only at the kitchen/dining room table.
  • Avoid eating while standing up.
  • Turn off all distractions and concentrate on the meal itself.
  • Avoid eating out of the package (plate your portion).

These are only a few possible overeating scenarios.  Others may include late night snacking, eating leftovers while cleaning up, the drive thru pull, skipping meals and than overindulging.  What ever your overeating issues may be your weight management counselor at CFWLS can help you explore solutions.

 

Dr. Clark’s Turkey Sliders

Posted on July 25, 2014 by

 

Dr. Clark at the grill

Dr. Clark at the grill

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. ground turkey (can use lean beef as well)
  • ½ cup crumbled feta cheese (can substitute shredded cheddar cheese)
  • ¼ cup sun-dried tomatoes
  • Chopped onion to taste
  • Pinch of sea salt, fresh cracked pepper
  • Fresh basil
  • Romaine lettuce leafs

Method:

  1. Prepare grill
  2. Place turkey, feta, sun-dried tomatoes, onion, basil and seasonings into a large bowl
  3. Mix until combined.
  4. Form ¼ cup little patty’s for grilling
  5. Grill until golden brown and cooked through
  6. Place cooked slider in lettuce leaf, add cheese if desired and other low/no carb condiments, wrap and eat!

Makes about 12 little sliders

Nutritional content (without condiments) for each wrapped slider: Calories 183; Protein 19 grams; Carbohydrate 2 grams; Fat 11 gramsPrint recipe – Turkey Sliders

Plastic Surgery After Weight Loss – Documentation Makes a Difference

Posted on July 23, 2014 by

Your Weight, Your Health, and Your Life After Weight Loss Surgery

Posted on July 23, 2014 by

Chromium to Curb Cravings

Posted on July 21, 2014 by

Many people struggle with the control of food cravings.  Being aware of this fact and knowing a little bit about our health and good nutrition can help when it comes to making wise decisions.  A deficiency in certain minerals may contribute to carbohydrate and sugar cravings.  Minerals (and their co-factors) are critical for adequate blood sugar control.  Some to mention are magnesium, manganese, zinc, and chromium.  Chromium is a co-factor with insulin and is essential for normal glucose utilization, for growth, and for longevity. Chromium is required for normal fat and carbohydrate metabolism.  It is found naturally in meats, shellfish and whole grains.

What Does Chromium Do?

Combined with exercise and a sensible diet, chromium helps:

  • Maintain healthy body weight and promotes normal energy metabolism
  • Maintain healthy cholesterol levels and promotes cardiovascular health
  • Promote normal insulin function and maintains healthy blood sugar levels
  • Prevent fat rebound

How Does Chromium Work?

Chromium is responsible for increasing the action of insulin in the body. Insulin is a   hormone responsible for transporting glucose inside cells and maintaining proper blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels in the body. Chromium helps insulin metabolize (burn) fat, turn protein into muscle and convert sugar into energy. In fact, chromium  activated insulin increases the amount of blood sugar available for energy production nearly two-fold.

Chromium is the master nutrient for controlling blood sugar. It helps overcome sugar cravings and level out highs and lows associated with a high carbohydrate diet. Adding CHROMEMATE to your diet supports the conversion of food to energy and increases metabolic rate. It’s an important part of a complete weight loss program.  Look for it in the supplement section of our nutrition store!

 

The Race Experience

Posted on July 17, 2014 by

A few weeks ago I ran The Chick-fil-a 10K race in Newport News at The Mariner’s Museum.  Every year I come up with the usual excuses not to run it:  too expensive, too busy, not prepared….yet every year I show up and have a great time.  (By the way, I finished 2nd overall female!).  Twenty-eight years ago I decided I wanted to be a runner.  However, sharp pains in my sides and the boredom factor made me realize running was NOT for me.  A year later the stress of college finals became so overwhelming that I re-visited running.  I discovered it was a great stress reliever!  After a few months I was running 2 miles.  I started running local 5K, 10K, and ½ marathon races and frequently won my age group.  Running races became my passion, and I traveled all over the Southeast competing in different races.  In 1991 I qualified for and ran the Boston Marathon.  Since 1990 I’ve shared my enthusiasm for running with anyone who will listen.  Even if you’re a self-proclaimed “couch potato” and aren’t fond of exercise, I challenge you to step out of your comfort zone and experience a race.  If you’re joints are bad, try walking.  It’s not just about the physical benefits.  The mental and emotional benefits are equally rewarding.

I’m an extremely competitive person by nature.  And, honestly, receiving awards is always an honor.  But what I love most about running is that it’s not a team sport.  I set personal goals for each race and strive to meet them.  One of our clients, Frankie Cupp, recently started running races.  She said, “In running my first 10K it was never about how well I would place. It was about the confidence I felt that I was actually doing something that even 6 months ago I would never think I’d be doing.  I found an inner strength in me that drives me to do better.”  In addition to strengthening your heart and lungs, competitive running is definitely a confidence builder.

The Specificity of Training Principal says that sports training should be relevant and appropriate to the sport which the individual is training in order to produce a training effect.  Therefore, if you want to compete in a 5K race, you must get out and run or walk!  Start training gradually and progress to 3 miles a few weeks prior to the race.  Every Sunday I run 8-10 miles.  Meeting my personal goals in the next race motivates me to get out of bed. In addition to training for the next race, it’s my quiet time away from the kids and my time to “commune” with nature and focus on my body.  Scott Haley is a Weight Management University client who is training for a ½ marathon. He said, “It’s a method to set a goal and train to that goal.  I started with 5K’s.  The fear of failure is a great motivator.  You’re not losing because you’re not competing against another person.  You’re competing against yourself.”

Race day is very exciting; adrenalin pumping, nervous energy, watching people of all shapes and sizes preparing for the big event. Some are athletes striving to set state records, some are the “race junkies” that show up for every race event, and some are “newbie’s” just excited by the whole race experience.   Thirty minutes before the start everyone is mulling around, using the port-o-potties, stretching and warming up.  Ten minutes before race time and the announcer tells runners to head for the start line.  The faster runners head to the front of the line.   A special guest sings The National Anthem.  I have my shaky hand on my pounding heart, tears in my eyes, and feel proud to be an American.  Next, the wheelchair racers go and I wonder how many of them were wounded in the Middle East.  The countdown is 1 minute and I’m getting myself mentally prepared. I tell myself, “Don’t fear losing.  Fear quitting.”  3-2-1 and the gun shot goes off.  Spectators are cheering everyone on, music is booming in the distance, and everyone has the same goal:  the finish line. They’re all here for different reasons.  Maybe it’s to win a prize, get points for their running group, raise money for a charity, to set a fitness goal, or to lose weight.  We’re all in this together now.  Along the way, volunteers are handing out water and shouting out motivational words.

Our enthusiastic employee, Tina, is a runner, and perfectly summed up racing. “It’s an experience.  It’s more of a mental thing; mind over matter.  When you don’t believe you can do something and you achieve it.  It’s an amazing feeling.  I love the endorphins! Everyone at the race is happy.  It’s one big joyous, healthy occasion from the camaraderie to the cheering supporters”

The cheering spectators help tremendously with motivation to keep going. The FINISH line appears in the distance and it’s like a “Chariots of Fire” moment.  You can do it!  You can see it! You cross the finish line and feel invincible! Race volunteers hand you water, bananas, and a protein bar. Most importantly, you win a shiny medal to wear proudly around your neck. (I keep all my certificates, medals, plaques, and trophies on my special “running bookcase.”).  Every race is a different and unique experience.  Sometimes they serve pizza, beer (!), offer free massages, give away raffle prizes, or have concerts.

At the awards ceremony, trophies or plaques are handed out to overall and age group winners. Overall winners often get additional gifts such as gift certificates or money.  The truth is everyone who showed up and participated is a winner!  Each person got a medal, race t-shirt (part of the sign up cost), and a bib number.  I write down my times on my bib numbers and keep them for my running scrapbook. Brenda Nickel is a former client at CFWLS who participates in triathlons.  She recounted to me, “Races are a great way to remind me how far I have come and how much further I can go.  They are also a great way to keep me in my pants!”

CFWLS at Color Me Rad 2013

CFWLS at Color Me Rad 2013

To find a local race either visit a running store or just Google races in your area.  There are so many to choose from.  The most fun I’ve ever had in a race was the Color Me Rad 5K.  These “brighten your spirits” races are held throughout the country at various locations.  The staff at  CFWLS has participated for the past two years.  You start the race with a white t-shirt and finish looking like a tie-dyed hippy.  During the event, overly-zealous volunteers pelt you with color bombs of blue, green, pink ,purple, and yellow.  It’s an action-packed, amusing time for the whole family.  It was Cat Keller’s first race.  She said, “I walked the 5K.  I’m not a runner.  I’d rather do hot yoga or lift weights. However, I would do another race.  I felt so good after the race I could have done a 10K.  It’s better to have a friend with you because you’re exercising but you don’t even know it.”

I challenge you to find a race and start training. It doesn’t’ matter what your fitness level is. “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.”It could become your passion.  If you want more information on how to train for a race, please contact Jim Bradley or Arlyne Spalla Benson at The Center for Weight Loss Success.

Not Feeling Inspired?

Posted on July 14, 2014 by

questionNot feeling inspired?  Or is it motivated?  What’s the difference?  Motivation comes from within—it’s about psyching yourself up.  Inspiration is often comes from external forces—things or people around you that encourage you to reach a little higher, pull a little harder or do more than you originally thought possible.  Inspiration is the cause, Motivation is the effect.  Now you just need to find what works for you!

Inspiration comes in many forms and you may find it in unexpected places—be ready.

When it comes to weight loss, it’s always good to listen to those that have succeeded in doing what you want to accomplish.  We have video testimonials as well as posters and posts but  coming to support group and/or attending education class puts you face to face with people that can make a difference and help you achieve success.

Words that you hear, whether spoken or written, may spark an emotion inside of you. They might be from someone you are close to or someone you’ve never met.  Dr. Clark tweets a short note each day that sends information and encouragement your way.  Each week you receive a brief newsletter from us that highlights a specific topic related to weight loss and provides a  gentle  reminder to make the choices that lead to your goals.

Try one of the short & simple exercise options that we have for you on our YouTube sight.  A few of our trainers have put together effective ways for you to strengthen your muscles and increase your lean body mass.  Most of them take less than 5 minutes and can be done without fitness equipment.  Five minutes—you owe it to yourself!

Recipes may inspire you to create a healthy entrée for dinner.  That healthy dinner may inspire you to create a menu plan for the entire week.  The menu plan may motivate you to make up a shopping list and pick up the items you will use to nourish this healthy new lifestyle.  I think you get the idea—one thing leads to another and soon you are unstoppable.

Look around you, inspiration is everywhere.  Success is in sight!

 

Check out a few of the ways we seek to inspire you:

Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/weightlossdrclark

Follow us on Pinterest:  www.pinterest.com/cfwlsva

Receive tips on Twitter: www.twitter.com/docweightloss

Get inspired at: www.youtube.com/docweightloss

 

Easy Eggs for a Make-Ahead Breakfast

Posted on July 11, 2014 by

Use your imagination and get creative!

Ingredients

Get Creative!

Get Creative!

12 eggs

Ham

Deli meats

Bacon

Cheeses – shredded

Onions – diced

Mushrooms – sliced

Peppers – diced

Spinach – cooked, drained

 

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Spray muffin cups with cooking spray.
  3. Line bottom or sides of each cup with bacon or deli slice. (optional)
  4. Break egg directly into cup or into bowl to scramble with other ingredients.
  5. Top with choice of meats, veggies and cheeses or mix into egg in bowl.
  6. Pour scrambled mixture into each cup and top with more veggies or cheese.
  7. Bake at 350 for 20-25 minutes. (Watch the bacon so it doesn’t burn)

Notes: I like to use the pre-cooked bacon to save time. Round deli slices fit nicely in the cups. Many of the ingredients work better if you saute for a few minutes.

Makes 12 mini breakfasts

Nutrition Facts will vary by choice of ingredients:

Calories 100-150

Effective Carbohydrates <5g

Protein 10-15g

 

Print recipe  Easy Egg Options for a Make-Ahead Breakfast

 

Recipes converted from:

Thesimpledelights.com

Bakeatmidnight.com

Manilaspoon.com

 

Fast Food Without Diet Disaster

Posted on July 09, 2014 by

I’m Not Looking Back After My Sleeve Gastrectomy

Posted on July 09, 2014 by