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Tag Archives: indulging

Bouncing Back from Childhood Obesity

Posted on May 07, 2014 by

How Can I Control My Cravings?

Posted on April 28, 2014 by

Food cravings are real!  While hunger produces physical sensations such as  stomach growling, lightheadedness and weakness that signals your body for the need of fuel, food cravings are an intense desire for a specific food choice. Normal hunger can be satisfied with a variety of foods while a craving can only be satisfied with a specific food, normally a sweet.

With that in mind, could there be a physiological component to cravings?  The answer is yes.  It is not all about will power.  Neurochemicals and hormones play a large part in hunger,   cravings, fullness and satiety.

There are over seventy neurochemicals that have been identified that play a role in memory, appetite and mood.  A few of them you may have heard of such as endorphins, serotonin and dopamine.   In addition to these neurochemicals, hormones also play an important part in  cravings, hunger and satiety.  They include insulin, cortisol, and leptin plus many more.

Let take a closer look at insulin.  This is a hormone that is produced by the pancreatic cells and is responsible for regulating blood sugar levels.  Since blood sugar is probably the single most important factor controlling appetite and mood, insulin is a key player in causing food cravings.

When we eat carbohydrates they are reduced to simple sugars.  These sugars enter our blood stream and trigger an insulin release.  The more refined foods containing ‘simple carbohydrates’, such as Dr. Clarks six C’s, lead to a quick release of insulin followed by a rapid drop in blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that triggers an intense need (craving) for more carbohydrates.

To eliminate or minimize this physiological aspect of cravings try:

  • Controlling your blood sugar swings by eating protein every few hours, at every meal as well as for snacks.  Keeping your carbohydrate levels below or equal to your protein   levels will help.
  • Avoiding those 6 C’s as well as rice, pasta, bread and potato (Think back to Chapter 1 WMU™ ).  These can raise your blood sugars fairly quickly.
  • Carrying protein-based snacks with you at all times. Never let yourself become famished.
  • Adding the mineral chromium picolinate has shown to be useful in curbing cravings.
  • Exercising helps get your mind off thinking about foods as well as utilize those excess    sugars in your blood stream.
  • Giving yourself a fifteen minute timeout.  Wait about fifteen minutes to see if the craving goes away.

 

Drive Thru Dilemma

Posted on April 08, 2014 by

What are My Low Carb Alternatives to High Carb Choices?

Posted on February 17, 2014 by

Cutting back on carbohydrates can be a challenge at times but by learning to replace them with ones that taste nearly identical can be a really good alternative that can keep us on track.  Here we offer food substitutions for hash browns, mashed potatoes, lasagna, spaghetti, scalloped potatoes and bread:

For Hash Browns use summer squash instead of potatoes.  Simply grate the squash, mixing it with egg so that you can form patties and then frying them in olive oil.  They may not be as firm and crispy as hash browns but they will have potato flavor and you will eliminate 15 grams of carbohydrates.

For Mashed Potatoes use cauliflower instead of potatoes.  You can steam some fresh cauliflower in the microwave, spraying it with butter substitute and then pureeing it in a food processor or blender with a little nonfat half-and-half substitute.  You can then season with salt and pepper and add roasted garlic, cheese or sour cream to the mixture.  You will eliminate 30 grams of carbohydrate per cup.

Zucchini ribbons are a great substitution in lasagna!

Zucchini ribbons are a great substitution in lasagna!

For Lasagna use zucchini slices for noodles.  You can slice 4-5 zucchini squash lengthwise into ¾ inch strips, sprinkling them with Italian seasoning and placing them on a nonstick cookie sheet.  Once you have baked them for 20 minutes at 425 degrees, you can make lasagna by replacing the noodles with these baked zucchini strips.  You will eliminate 36 carbohydrate grams per serving.

For Spaghetti use spaghetti squash.  Simply cut a spaghetti squash in half, removing the seeds and placing each half, cut side down, on a plate with ¼ cup of water.  Microwave for 10 minutes until soft to the touch, cool and then scrape out all the “spaghetti” strands.  Spaghetti squash has the same consistency as spaghetti and you will eliminate 30 carbohydrate grams per cup.

For Scalloped Potatoes  replace potatoes with tempeh.  Simply sauté thinly sliced tempeh with garlic and onions, covering it with a sharp cheese sauce and baking it for 30 minutes.  The tempeh will taste like a slightly nutty baked potato.  You will save 11 grams of carbohydrates per cup.

For Bread substitute Napa or Chinese cabbage.  You can roll your favorite cold cuts into a cabbage leaf instead of bread and dip the roll into a little mayonnaise or mustard.  This way,  you will eliminate 29 grams of carbohydrates per sandwich.

Could Appetite Suppressants Help Me Lose Weight?

Posted on February 12, 2014 by

Should I Take Supplements to Curb Cravings?

Posted on February 05, 2014 by

Controlling Your Cravings

Posted on January 13, 2014 by

Food cravings are real!  While hunger produces physical sensations such as  stomach growling, lightheadedness and weakness that signals your body for the need of fuel, food cravings are an intense desire for a specific food choice.  Normal hunger can be satisfied with a variety of foods while a craving can only be satisfied with a specific food, normally a sweet.

With that in mind, could there be a physiological component to cravings?  The answer is yes.  It is not all about will power. Neurochemicals and hormones play a large part in hunger,   cravings, fullness and satiety.

There are over seventy neurochemicals that have been identified that play a role in memory, appetite and mood. A few of them you may have heard of such as endorphins, serotonin and dopamine. In addition to these neurochemicals, hormones also play an important part in  cravings, hunger and satiety. They include insulin, cortisol, and leptin plus many more.

Let take a closer look at insulin. This is a hormone that is produced by the pancreatic cells and is responsible for regulating blood sugar levels. Since blood sugar is probably the single most important factor controlling appetite and mood, insulin is a key player in causing food cravings.

When we eat carbohydrates they are reduced to simple sugars. These sugars enter our blood stream and trigger an insulin release. The more refined foods containing ‘simple carbohydrates’, such as Dr. Clarks six C’s, lead to a quick release of insulin followed by a rapid drop in blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that triggers an intense need (craving) for more carbohydrates.

To eliminate or minimize this physiological aspect of cravings try:

Controlling your blood sugar swings by eating protein every few hours, at every meal as well as for snacks.  Keeping your carbohydrate levels below or equal to your protein   levels will help.

Avoiding those crunchy 6 C’s as well as rice, pasta, bread and potato.  These can raise your blood sugars fairly quickly.

Carrying protein-based snacks with you at all times. Never let yourself become famished.

Adding the mineral chromium picolinate has shown to be useful in curbing cravings.

Exercise helps get your mind off thinking about foods as well as utilize those excess sugars in your blood stream.

Giving yourself a fifteen minute timeout.  Wait about fifteen minutes to see if the craving goes away.

 

Peanut Butter Fudge

Posted on December 27, 2013 by

This was a big hit at our December Open House so we are sharing the recipe!

 

Peanut Butter Fudge

Peanut Butter Fudge

Peanut Butter Fudge

1 Scoop Protizyme Peanut Butter Cookie Shake Mix

1/2 C Almond Flour

1/4 Teaspoon Salt

3 Tablespoons Coconut oil

4 Tablespoons Peanut Butter (Smooth)

Mix all the dry ingredients and add coconut oil until you get a paste-like consistency. Pack the mixture firmly into a 1 inch tray. Take 4 Tablespoons peanut butter and heat for 15 seconds. Melt the peanut butter in the microwave and pour it onto of the fudge, spreading it evenly. Cool in the fridge for 15 minutes. Then cut 12 bite-sized pieces and enjoy!

Protein 5g Carbs 2g

 

Back in the Groove

Posted on December 02, 2013 by

Thanksgiving weekend is behind us. No matter how you strayed, don’t wait to return to your healthy eating plan — every day you put it off makes it harder to get back on track. Here are their tips for making the transition a successful one.

Reclaim your spot!

Reclaim your spot!

Don’t avoid the scale
Go straight back to weighing in — get right back in the groove.

Commit, plan and journal
Make the promise to yourself before you even take the first steps. Then make grocery lists, prepare healthy snacks and meals, and write down every bite.

Get up and move

Exercise is not only a way to speed up the loss of pounds put back on, it will also improve your mental outlook.

I find that after a day (or, let’s be honest, a week or more!) of being out of control, it’s important to try to exercise first thing in the morning.   If I just make myself get out and take a 20 minute walk around the neighborhood, I am more motivated almost instantly. Early morning exercise wakes up my body and makes me feel like being healthier all day.

Think about the big picture
Weight gain over a vacation will not undo every bit of success you’ve had, so look at the big picture and move forward.

Sometimes the focus shifts from losing the weight to learning how to maintain. That means accepting the various ups and downs along the way. There will always be vacations and parties and holidays. We all need to learn how to enjoy these (without the guilt) and to get right back on plan to prevent the inevitable downward spiral that happens when we give up on ourselves and our goals.

Prepare for next time
The best advice I have for you is to not stray in the first place.

Christmas and New Years will bring on more temptations but by planning for these obstacles, you can & will succeed in making your weight loss goals!

Stress and Its Effect on Your Weight

Posted on November 20, 2013 by